Anybody else

Information about how to manage or reduce the severity of BFS symptoms

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Anybody else

Postby Pole on July 9th, 2003, 7:04 am

I have new spot twiching. It is a muscle on my hand (palm) which is a prolongation (continuation) of the smallest finger. Twiching is very fine and quite fast (it's like tickling). Visible. But the smallest finger does NOT twich.

Do you have the same sensations?
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Postby Craig on July 9th, 2003, 7:49 am

Yes, I've had the same thing but it was between my thumb and index finger. It lasted on and off for a couple of weeks and finally just went away.
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Postby Pole on July 9th, 2003, 8:21 am

And one more thing: I can induce it by moving rapidly the smallest finger.
Strange.
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Postby Craig on July 9th, 2003, 8:37 am

I don't remember being able to "induce" the twitching in my hand, but I'm pretty sure that I never tried. I would bet that it goes away before too long.
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Postby Jenn311 on July 9th, 2003, 8:40 am

I've had that exact same thing in the exact same spot several times. It will eventually go away. I think the fact that you are able to induce it means that it is more likely to be caused by tension in your muscles. I am no doctor, but this is what I have noticed about hot spots like that on me. Try and relax that part of your body and see if it goes away.
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Postby Pole on July 10th, 2003, 2:55 am

Nobody else???? :?
I want to tell you that these twiches in palm are really scaring for me. Before I had only quite strong twiches, usually single - I think most of them were not fasciculations (which is a contraction of muscle fascicle - really small part of a muscle). As a matter of fact I could call fasciculations some of twiches in my calves only.
Generally it is something between fascic and myoclonic (stronger than fascic but not strong enough for myoclonic).

These new twiches in palm are diffrent - very fine, multiple - it would be very hard to count how many twiches is during one "attack" and these "attacks" are quite often. These new twiches are rhythmic but the rhythm is variable even during one "attack". Example: 15-20 really fast twiches, after that 5 slower ones and again 20 very fast.

That is how I imagine ALS fasciculations :(

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Postby KERRI on July 10th, 2003, 5:36 am

Pole wrote:Nobody else???? :?
I want to tell you that these twiches in palm are really scaring for me. Before I had only quite strong twiches, usually single - I think most of them were not fasciculations (which is a contraction of muscle fascicle - really small part of a muscle). As a matter of fact I could call fasciculations some of twiches in my calves only.
Generally it is something between fascic and myoclonic (stronger than fascic but not strong enough for myoclonic).

These new twiches in palm are diffrent - very fine, multiple - it would be very hard to count how many twiches is during one "attack" and these "attacks" are quite often. These new twiches are rhythmic but the rhythm is variable even during one "attack". Example: 15-20 really fast twiches, after that 5 slower ones and again 20 very fast.

Do not use this as a guide, a fasciculation is a fasciculation, they are the same thing, whether it be ALS or BFS it is hard to decide, because the same fasciculations occur in both.

Kerri
That is how I imagine ALS fasciculations :(

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Postby Asterix on July 10th, 2003, 6:32 am

KERRI is right,

Pole you simply fell into a common trap for beginner-BFSers, namely trying to "classify" your twitches in "good" and "bad" ones, based on clinical features like frequency, size, pattern etc. etc.

I for myself spent the first 6 months or so, totally obsessed by the very same question.

The truth is (supported by numerous studies) that benign (BFS) fasciculations can *not* be distinguished from "malignant" ons (ALS)
by physical/clinical features or patterns. Even on EMG signature it is impossible to tell the two apart (if you don't belive this please search the archives at teleemg.com)

That is why you can read in every neurology textbook sentences like:

"Isolated Fasciculations have no diagnostic significance"

(note that "isolated" means: no other neurological deficits are present
that accompany the fascics)
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Postby Pole on July 10th, 2003, 7:17 am

Asterix, thanks for sharing your experiences with me.
But I am still worry. Terrible thing is that I read in few Polish articles about ALS that first muscles affected by atrophy are often small muscles of palm (the muscle between thumb and index finger or the muscle I've described in my first post). They said that it was typical for ALS.

I was suprised with one more thing I've read. When they mention symptoms they always point at fasciculations in "shoulder band" (I am not sure if I use correct English word "band" - I mean muscles around body equal shoulders). Have you ever heard that these muscles' fasciculations are more common in ALS?

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