[b]Alcohol and symptoms[/b]

Information about how to manage or reduce the severity of BFS symptoms

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[b]Alcohol and symptoms[/b]

Postby Rioja on January 27th, 2003, 8:28 am

I have noticed that when I drink alcohol, all my symptoms reduce and can even disappear completely. This effect may last through the next day especially if I've had too much. MY sysmptoms have only ever been fascics and the odd cramping concentrated in feet and calf area, with the usual roaming twitch elsewhere. Now obviously I can't get boozed in everyday, but is there a natural sedative that can have the same effect as alcohol?

:P [/quote]
Its tough, but always try and look on the bright side. this condition is after all benign, it could be a lot lot worse :)
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Postby gamom on January 28th, 2003, 10:19 pm

Alcohol helps my twitches too. It must be the relaxing effect that does it.
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Alcohol

Postby Davidd on February 1st, 2003, 7:04 pm

If it seems to help you then by all means, drink alcohol! For me, it sometimes actually makes the twitching worse....but I still have some drinks here and there.

--David
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I think were all so different

Postby Rioja on February 3rd, 2003, 7:38 am

Hi Dave
I've spent a few hours on this site and read many of the v interesteing articles and replies. I am really starting to beleive that there are probably numerous different reasons why these facics occur in each of us. We're all so complex and various factors in our lives affect them. When i told a friend of mine about my fasics he said "oh yeah I had some of thos a few years ago". He didn't look into the cause of them, he wasn't worried about them, he was just that sort of person who didn't give a monkey's about that sort of thing. And they went!
cheers
Max :wink:
Its tough, but always try and look on the bright side. this condition is after all benign, it could be a lot lot worse :)
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Personality

Postby Davidd on February 3rd, 2003, 9:28 pm

I definitely think that personality plays a part into how each of us deals with the twitches. For most people, however, who experience unusual sensations (such as twitches), there comes a point where you start to worry about it for whatever reason. I think my biggest fears were not that it was ALS or some other disease but rather that it would simply never go away. Over time, I think we all can get used to most things. That said, pain is probably one of the hardest things to get used to (if it's even possible to get used to it) so we should probably be very thankful that we are not in severe pain which is caused by the twitches.

Anyway, tonight my twitches are flairing up in my calves quite a bit and I still on my journey to trying to live with it as best as I can. I actually get a little amusement out of watching my calves twitch...I just stare and wonder why they don't just stop!

--David
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Laugh

Postby Rioja on February 4th, 2003, 10:05 am

Dave
if you can laugh at them thats great. I must admit I often think to myself they are benign, they're not doing naything so why don't they just stop!! What winds me up the most is when they just disappear for no reason............ooooo where have they gone..........when are they coming back.........!
keep laughing and smiling

:D
Its tough, but always try and look on the bright side. this condition is after all benign, it could be a lot lot worse :)
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laughing

Postby Davidd on February 4th, 2003, 10:22 pm

Well-

When I wrote that msg yesterday I really thought I was laughing at them a little, but I guess they struck back and last night's sleep was last than excellent...not because I was worried but more because of that annoying sensation. Ah well, hopefully tonight is better... I do agree that sometimes it feels like they've gone away and then BOOM, they're back!

--David
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Postby Arron on February 21st, 2003, 1:22 am

alcohokl de-sensitizes the nervous system, just like when you are drunk and you fall down in a drunken stuper, you don;t feel it... until the next day.

Self medicating with alcohol does make the twitches seem less prevelant, but usually the next day, during the hang-over period, the symptoms become worse.

Please be careful if you use alcohol to "feel" better. It isn't "making" the BFS go away. All it's doing is "numbing" your nervous system so you don;t feel or notice the twitches anymore. It would be easy to become addicted to alcohol if you "believed" that it makes your BFS go away... it doesn't. It certainly "appears" to make it go away, but in reality, it's just not true.

Now, don't go thinking I'm an anti-alcohol person. Trust me, I put away more than my fair share of good Tequila, VO, good brandy and good wine on regular basis, but not with intentions of making the twitches go away.
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alcohol and bfs

Postby izzie on February 22nd, 2003, 3:45 am

I was interested to read about all your experiences wi alcohol. I gave it up for 4 weeks and was probably more tense. The neuor said he though a few drinks would be a good idea. I am sure that was for relaxation as I now enjoy a glass or 2 of wine regularly. I agree wi Aaron that it is not a treatment and excess alcohol may even aggrevate the symptoms the next day and also disturb normal sleep. Having said that normal sleep is a distant memoryfor me right now!
I think the personality factors are probably important in determining how we respond to this condition as David suggested. I once knew a guy whose calfs twitched all the time and he didnt bat an eyelid and 99% of the time he wasnt even aware of it. That amazed me and that is my goal. I also hope that making lifestyle changes including reducing the demands on me from family and work that I have more vigour to get out there and live my life and laugh alot more. Anyone else identify with those issues ?
heres to a full life
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Postby Davidd on February 26th, 2003, 10:19 pm

Alcohol can effect sleep quality which in turn effects how you feel the next day and how sensitive you are to the twitches. I actually had a couple drinks after work tonight and right now the twitching in my calves is going a bit crazy! So maybe alcohol does aggravate the symptoms? Who knows...I don't drink very often so maybe a lower tolerance also has something to do with it...

--David
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Postby Arron on February 27th, 2003, 9:09 pm

Typical BFS... if you read all of the posts in this thread and other threads on the subject of alcohol and BFS, you'll find that in some people the symptoms lessen and in other's, they get worse. This is why it is so difficult to come to any hard conclusions with this stuff, everyone reacts differently to certain "remedies" or "treatments".

BFS is VERY individual and the ONLY common yhing is that everyone twitches in one way or many others... some with pain, some without, but that's about as far as the "normal" goes with this stuff...
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