Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby Yuliasir on May 8th, 2015, 12:37 am

Oh, MItra, I think who would buy a book about healthy diet if it would tell on the cover: This is your way to less gases! But if it says: This would prevent you from Alzheimer (ask me how) - believe me the sales would be rocket high :)))

for me getting rid of indigestion is a really valuable and excellent result which you get from reading apocalyptic book about grains. Who knows if you would avoid alzheimer becasue of non eating gluten, but definitely right now you are feeling much better :)
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby Xina535 on May 13th, 2015, 4:04 am

Not sure if it was mentioned here (I could have overlooked it), but is there anything to be said about REDUCING gluten instead of going completely gluten free? Or would the body react the same way even if just a little bit of gluten was ingested. I can see myself exchanging many products for gluten free ones, but it would take a while before I got to know what has gluten in it, where to buy it, etc.
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby Yuliasir on May 13th, 2015, 5:14 am

If you exclude wheat and rye bread (in favour of potato or rice based versions), regular pasta (in favour of rice noodles or buckwheat noodles), all kinds of wheat and rye baked products and, of course, beer, that's would be enough. Rice, buckwheat and canola are gluten free grains. Not sure about corn, but looks like it is also gluten free.
For now gluten free flour and ready-made products are sold in any supermarket (almost in any). japanese cousing is also a good advise if you want something tasty and gluten free. Glu-free bread is not bad but extremely solid and easily getting stone hard. Rice noodles are tasteles, and those are the only disadvntages if this diet I think.
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby SecretAgentMan on May 13th, 2015, 9:01 am

Unfortunately gluten-lite diets can be just as detrimental as full gluten diets, if it is a trigger food for you. The reason is the inflammation it causes. A little causes inflammation just the same as a lot. If you are going to commit, go full in or don't bother. We all live our lives with the consequences of the choices we make. If something is important enough we do what we can to make it work. Dietary changes are never easy, but they are possible.
If your mind is your own worst enemy, why not make friends with it and turn it into your greatest ally? Mental discipline is achievable and there is help available. Learn what works for you, practice, and change your life for the better.
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby mwagner on May 13th, 2015, 10:43 am

I agree with S.A.M. You can't reduce it by a certain amount. It's pretty much an all or nothing thing. Even the tiniest bit causes gastrointestinal issues for me (and Yuliasir - I giggled at your post in response to mine).

I have been GF for so long, I actually find it easy. The only thing I truly miss, is when I go to a restaurant and they bring a basket of freshly baked bread. That's tough. Other than that, it's relatively easy.

Watch out for anything that has soy sauce in it. The second ingredient after water is wheat in soy sauce. But, Tamari (gluten free soy sauce) tastes exactly the same. Even my stubborn husband admitted that he would never know the difference. And here in the states, most Chinese restaurants, sushi places, etc., all accommodate for that. 1/3 of all households in the states have someone who needs to eat gluten free.

If you look on the bright side - there are tons and tons of gluten free foods that you can buy that taste as good or better (in my opinion - baked goods like cake, cookies, brownies -- not that I eat much of that kind of stuff - taste better GF than not). I have a bag of corn flour, rice flour and almond flour on hand to bake with and thicken sauces with. It's not that hard.

I would give it a try and see if it helps with your symptoms. But, when you're on a trial period - you need to be 100% gluten free. Even the tiniest bit might trigger something in you.
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby German2 on May 16th, 2015, 2:49 pm

Just a small contribution from my side: I stopped with gluten in January, later on I started a strong supplement regime. Not just because of twitching but becausse of the whole symptom story...The LTT Test (Lymphocyte transformation test showing the delayed intolerance reactions) was positive on gluten now...Celiac antibody test was negative on the other hand.

What the twitching is concerned: Actually almost none. But I was never a strong twitcher I have to admit. I have other problems in the front. Tight muscles is the biggest. And that got worse over the last month...so I have a mixed outcome of my self testing :D .

I have lots of nutrition intolerances/allergies (my daughters are the same, both suffering from frequent bowel pain) ...F. ex. two days ago I started with chlorella algae. First day just two pellets....strong squits next day. Second day I tried five at once (recommended starting dose of my doctor). Just half minute later I had a strong pressure on my lungs, headache and sick feeling lasting the hole day.

On the other hand I had a fantastic outcome when starting with a combination of Gluthatione and organic sulfur..Just the other day after first dose, my strong daily fatigue was gone and up to now did not come back. My energy is back, and after three days I reduced my thyroid hormones 30% (reduction was recommended by doctor anyway so I dared to) without any negative effect. Maybe it was just a perfect combination with all the other supplements or maybe I found the right one for me, personally against my fatigue.

Anyway. What I want to confirm here is, that it can be worth to try some changes in diet. It seems to be very individual, what helps. although it did not solve all my problems up to now...
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby misterjuanperalta on May 17th, 2015, 5:35 am

Any thoughts on this: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=21595#p162362
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby SecretAgentMan on May 18th, 2015, 7:19 pm

Ha Mitra... I read your post yesterday and had your exact scenario happen to me for dinner that evening. We stopped at Outback Steakhouse for dinner on our way home from Washington DC and they brought out a big cutting board with their delicious bread and butter. You are right that this is probably the hardest part about being gluten free. Other than the bread restaurants bring out it really is pretty easy. I did the gluten free diet back in 2011 and am now newly back on it again here in 2015. The difference 4 years makes is night and day. I used to ask about gluten free options at restaurants and the waiters and waitresses would almost always look puzzled like, "what's gluten?" Now it is more common than not for restaurants to have a dedicated gluten free menu. Even pizza places are making gluten free pizza with crusts that are indistinguishable from the gluten versions. It has never been easier to be gluten free. Even Wendy's has a gluten free apple pecan chicken salad that is delicious. This isn't only a restaurant change that is taking place. Grocery store food items are more and more commonly labeled right on the front of the package if they are gluten free. In 2011 it was quite difficult but now it is actually quite easy. I used to accidentally ingest gluten sending me into a guaranteed day of symptom flare up. Now I have only had one slip up due to an ill informed Mexican restaurant staff about which products on their menu are gluten free. I should have known better in that situation, but the price I pay for a slip up isn't as bad as it used to be. Now I don't have twitching but lymphatic system inflammation to deal with.
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby mwagner on May 18th, 2015, 7:54 pm

Lymphatic system inflammation? That doesn't sound good!! I'm going to send you an email... we need to catch up!

But, I totally agree - there are so many options now to be gluten free. My husband orders GF pizza at our favorite pizza place, because he likes the crust more than the regular. Baked goods can really be even better, in my opinion, with tapioca flour, rice flour, etc.

I had someone say once (who was gluten free due to having a husband and daughter with celiac) - that people think bloating after dinner is a normal thing. Once you cut out gluten, often you'll find out that that bloat was totally related to gluten and not being full....

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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby SecretAgentMan on May 18th, 2015, 8:46 pm

mwagner wrote:Lymphatic system inflammation? That doesn't sound good!!


It is really not that bad. Over the last few months I had been having minor swelling and tenderness in the lymph nodes that are in the groin area. This is exactly like what BFSBurger is experiencing, strangely enough. I found that gluten was again my culprit. This time it is not an allergic reaction though, so the acupuncture allergy elimination techniques are no good to me. I take it as a sign that my body just cannot handle processed GMO wheat that is so prevalent in our diets. The abuse seems to have cumulatively taken a toll. By avoiding gluten I am living a normal and happy life so all is well.
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby Xina535 on May 21st, 2015, 11:15 am

Ok - stupid question:

If gluten was the cause of inflammation, why would the signs and symptoms not show up earlier in life? Why would the symptoms come later like 30 something?

I had a talk about this with a collegaue who has arthritis and collitis and she said after 1 month of gluten free and she was much better. I am very intrigued and as soon as I can tackle these mental problems where I can get out of bed and do things like focus, I will definitely look at a plan to try gluten free for me.

But that question still roams my head, just curious if anyone knows or provide input.

Another question - can you be tested against gluten allergy? Sorry if it was mentioned already. I am not really at my best right now...
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby SecretAgentMan on May 21st, 2015, 11:43 am

Xina535 wrote:Ok - stupid question:

If gluten was the cause of inflammation, why would the signs and symptoms not show up earlier in life? Why would the symptoms come later like 30 something?


Physiology changes as we age. Metabolism slows down, cardiac output decreases, lungs show impaired gas exchange, wounds heal slower, etc. We just can't handle stresses to the body like we used to. Gluten is a complex protein and the digestive system's resistance to it breaks down.

Xina535 wrote:I had a talk about this with a collegaue who has arthritis and collitis and she said after 1 month of gluten free and she was much better. I am very intrigued and as soon as I can tackle these mental problems where I can get out of bed and do things like focus, I will definitely look at a plan to try gluten free for me.


Just a suggestion but you may want to consider trying this since it may give you the relief you are looking for. I know it seems overwhelming at first but it truly is easier now than ever before to go gluten free. I had horrible brain fog and anxiety in my worst point with BFS. Both went dramatically down once I went gluten free. By putting it off until you feel better may be putting off the very thing that can help you feel better. Just a suggestion...

Xina535 wrote:Another question - can you be tested against gluten allergy? Sorry if it was mentioned already. I am not really at my best right now...


There are blood tests for certain antibodies that can help determine if you have an immune reaction to certain foods like gluten. They are not perfect but they can give you and idea of what is best for you to aviod. You can still have negative affects from foods though even if you are not experiencing an immune response. I think the best way to really know is to just try the diet changes out for a few weeks. Good luck.
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

Postby Xina535 on May 21st, 2015, 11:59 am

thanks! makes sense about the aging....about starting now, I really cant. I am hardly eating anything. I need to get these meds changed and get used to them, and see if I am going to be admitted to the hospital or not. I did already look up places I can buy gluten stuff online. Baby steps...
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Re: Researchers Propose Link Between Gluten & ALS

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