BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

This forum is for posting your personal experiences with BFS: symptoms, doctor visits, fears, etc.

Please use this forum to post give and recieve encoragement and reassurance from sharing the trials and triumphs you have faced.

Moderators: JohnV, Arron, garym

BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby yaumno on July 17th, 2013, 3:57 am

Hello everyone,

My name is Spencer. I apologize in advance for the length of this message, however, please bear with me. I believe that my experiences over the last few months may help broaden the understanding of BFS and how it may develop. Also, thanks in advance for reading!

In February I moved from Atlanta, Georgia to Taipei, Taiwan to teach English for a year. Unfortunately, I suffered an electrical injury from a wet light switch (110v, 15 amps) in my apartment on March 17, 2013.

The next day I went to the city hospital and saw a neurologist because something felt off. He noted that I had decreased pinprick sensation and some numbness/tingling in my right forearm and hand. I also had a great deal of pain running along the nerves in my arms, particularly underneath the bicep and along my forearm. He prescribed me some Vitamin B12 capsules (Methylcobalamin), along with a low dose of oral Prednisolone (Compesolon).

Although this may misguide some people, I do have to say that during these initial few days I felt very anxious and worried about my future health. When the neurologist noted that I had decreased sensation I immediately went home and began researching electrical injury. I didn't know beforehand but apparently there is a controversial but possible relationship between electrical injury and the onset of Motor Neuron Disease and ALS-like syndromes. Also, I had just recently moved to a foreign country and was experiencing the full effects of culture shock so this may have added to my worry.

Surprisingly, the numbness and tingling in my right forearm and hand resolved within a day or two. The pain remains but is not entirely unbearable. Now this is where it gets interesting. About 4 days after the accident I noticed that my biceps felt like they were shuddering or jumping when I performed actions. I started to perform different motions to see if I could notice anything unusual. Sure enough, I could see my biceps wiggle during certain motions. It was particularly noticeable if I placed my wrist at my shoulder and then elongated my arm completely at a medium speed. Within another day or two I started noticing that other muscle groups were doing the same thing. When descending down stairs I could feel my quadriceps shudder and jump. When bending over to pick something up off the ground, my lower back and pectoral muscles would shudder and jump. Within two weeks basically every muscle group from my jaw down, including my fingers, was experiencing this strange jerky movement pattern.

I decided to visit the National Taiwan University Hospital. The neurologists there had never seen this condition and also had limited knowledge of electrical injuries. They decided to run a few tests. The first was an SEP (Somatosensory Evoked Potentials) test on my arms and legs, the next was a Cervical Spine MRI, and the last was an EMG test (including needle EMG) on my arms. They also performed a blood test looking for CPK and general inflammatory responses. All of these returned normal results - leading the doctors to conclude that I did not have a diagnosable medical condition and that if there was damage from the electric shock then the tests were not sensitive enough to detect it.

My own research at home was just as fruitless. I researched for hours each day and learned as much as possible about movement disorders. However my symptoms were no where to be found. I did not have spacticity, rigitidy, hypertonia, clonus, myoclonus or any other of the standard symptoms present in neurological dysfunction. I decided to go back to the NTU Hospital and visit their physical therapy department. The doctor there noted something important - my shuddering and muscle jerking only occurred during eccentric contractions. (This term describes one of three possible states of muscle contraction. In this state, two muscles contract simultaneously with different amounts of tension in order to produce fluid movements. This is opposed to an isometric contraction where the muscles contract but do not move, and a concentric contraction where the muscle shortens as it contracts. A prime example of an eccentric contraction is the extending of the arm from a bent position - the bicep and tricep contract simultaneously with different amounts of force to let the arm slowly extend.)

Each time I learned more and came up with possibilities I went back to the neurologists and tried a new slew of medications to change or alter the muscle shaking. Over the course of April, May, and June I tried every drug imaginable including Imiprimine (tricyclic antidepressant to try and raise the resting potential of my neurons), Propranolol (beta-blocker to prevent anxiety induced adrenaline from affecting my nervous system), multiple muscle relaxers, Clonazepam (Klonapin, to reduce anxiety and prevent nervous system overactivity), Baclofen (to eliminate spasticity which wasn't actually present), and Alprazolam (Xanax, benzodiazepine to reduce anxiety). Although I took them in properly dosed shifts and for the recommended amount of time, these medications did nothing to change the muscle shaking.

After a while, my fear of my body becoming permanently disabled gave way to frustration and I started to research again. Finally, after months of searching, I found a post by "Caliburn" on an ALS forum describing the exact same muscle condition that I was describing. He called it "muscle ratcheting." I decided to use this as a search term and then Eureka! I came across this forum and found post after post of individuals describing the exact same muscle "ratcheting" that I had been experiencing for months! Some of the terminology that people were using was incorrect, and some individuals were confusing this condition with the more common "cog-wheel rigidity" found in Parkinson's disease (which is passive resistance to externally induced movement). However, the descriptions of their symptoms were so precisely like what I had tried to explain to my doctors that I knew I had found my elusive condition.

Strangely though, I was not experiencing many fasciculations. After tapering off of the Alprazolam (Xanax) a few weeks earlier, I had experienced a few days of intense twitching, but this is a common side effect of benzodiazapine withdrawl. Besides, I was still on an anti-depressant and other psychoactive medications which can produce strange muscle/nerve related side effects so I didn't even consider the occasional fasciculation to be unusual. Until this accident I never really had muscle fasciculations of any significance.

I have two other issues related to the shock including fine tremors in my fingers on both hands and continuing pain/stiffness/numbness in my right arm. However, I am posting here primarily because of the muscle ratcheting. After reading pretty much every post written by the small group of BFS sufferers with the "dreaded ratcheting" condition I have noticed that no one else had any specific trauma related to the onset of their symptoms. This is both puzzling and intriguing for me. So I want to ask:

Do you all think it is possible that my ratcheting was begun by my extreme anxiety immediately following the shock? Or do you think that it is possible that there has been a change in my nervous system that the neurological tests are simply unable to detect?

I have read numerous studies demonstrating EMG confirmed changes in the ion channels of motor neurons of lab rats following a purposefully administered electric shock, but I have also read many accounts of people who believe that their BFS was begun and highly aggravated solely by their anxiety.

I have gathered a huge amount of information about my specific circumstances (test results, symptomology), as well as BFS in general. If you would like clarification or elaboration on any of the points that I have mentioned please send me a message and I will get back to you. My hope is that this thread may lead to some informed discussion and provide possible research avenues for myself and the doctors upon my return to the states.

Sincerely,
Spencer

P.S. - A little about myself: I am 24 years old, 5'11, 155 lbs, I weight train about 5-6 times a week so I'm in good shape. Non-smoker, light drinker, no drug use.
Tempus edax rerum: "Time devours all things" - Ovid from "Metamorphoses"
yaumno
Interested
Interested
 
Posts: 18
Joined: July 9th, 2013, 8:04 am

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby Yuliasir on July 17th, 2013, 5:41 am

Hello,
as our fellow BFSBurger says, 'another athlet" ;))0 for some reasons many of our fellows are athletic people, and looks like there is a link between quite intence workouts and BFS.

as for electircal shock, I think it does not differ too much in therms of overall shocking effect from traffic accident, falling down from bike, giving a birth or moving to another country (which you have too - plus completely different climate and time difference!).
From that point of view your symptomes look rather common for BFS, and especially with good results of major tests I would like to say there is no big difference in exact trigger.
User avatar
Yuliasir
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 2952
Joined: March 3rd, 2012, 1:42 pm

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby yaumno on July 17th, 2013, 6:35 am

Yuliasir wrote:Hello,
as our fellow BFSBurger says, 'another athlet" ;))0 for some reasons many of our fellows are athletic people, and looks like there is a link between quite intence workouts and BFS.

as for electircal shock, I think it does not differ too much in therms of overall shocking effect from traffic accident, falling down from bike, giving a birth or moving to another country (which you have too - plus completely different climate and time difference!).
From that point of view your symptomes look rather common for BFS, and especially with good results of major tests I would like to say there is no big difference in exact trigger.


Thanks for the reply Yuliasir. I'm inclined to believe you, however, I was living in Taiwan for over a month before the accident and had no symptoms of BFS during that time. The symptoms developed within a few days of the electrical injury so I have a pretty strong feeling that the two are somehow related.

As for the electrical injury "shocking" (no pun intended) my system - I could see this possibility if other people had described accounts of some simple injury precipitating the onset of their BFS. (If they gave birth and soon after developed BFS, fallen off of a bicycle and soon developed BFS, etc.) However most of what I have read suggests that the fasciculations begin spontaneously without any specific cause.

Perhaps I was already anxious because of my circumstances and then the injury spiked my anxiety levels beyond the threshold required for BFS?

I don't really know enough about anxiety specifically to make that call, and that's one reason I wanted to post. I really do appreciate the response though - just talking about this gives me some hope.
Tempus edax rerum: "Time devours all things" - Ovid from "Metamorphoses"
yaumno
Interested
Interested
 
Posts: 18
Joined: July 9th, 2013, 8:04 am

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby Yuliasir on July 17th, 2013, 1:08 pm

practically thjose who did not report any physical shock later (when asking or by themselves) explain that they had a viral infection, an emotional stress (or several in line), many people started to have BFS after admission to college, on new job, before or soon after wedding, death of close relative (especially from ALS or cancer), just name it.
of course electrical trauma is a huge physical and emotional stress (least mentionen it is badly unpleasant).

sometimes even the slightest stress can lead to complete mess. My own BFS started with flu on vacations (we had a guy in the group with running nose and half of tour group was ill therefore), and since that I can not easily move even to my friends for 1000 km, not saying about big foreign trips - I immediately have cramps, flu, tonsillitis, urticaria with some quinke edema (especially horrible fear in the foreing country) etc etc. full set of *beep* :( It is how my body now repeatedly reacts for the initial stressful model situation "out of home = danger of disease", sometimes I laugh on that but sometimes feel very sad and depressed because I love travelling and got the possibility to do that on my own finally and BOOM!
BFS spoils everything.

So if your physical status was confiremed as good and safe, you just need more time I believe, and one day you'd feel better.
User avatar
Yuliasir
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 2952
Joined: March 3rd, 2012, 1:42 pm

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby muppetdog on July 17th, 2013, 2:27 pm

yaumno -

Pretty fascinating stuff.

So it has been only 4 months since you had your electrical accident? Approximately. Yours might just go away with time.

You say you started twitching after coming of Xanax?
You got the cogwheel before you subjected your body to the barrage of benzos and SSRIs?
I have had many Dr's say they can feel the ratcheting when they check for it. Have you had any Dr say they felt it?

Just some curiosity questions.

MD
User avatar
muppetdog
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 224
Joined: March 30th, 2012, 2:53 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby BFSBurger on July 17th, 2013, 4:25 pm

1) Understand first and foremost that the medical system knows very little about anything pertaining to the brain, nervous system, and the immune system. As such, be aware that there is a whole universe of disorders that have no explanation at this point in time, and we all may fall into that category quite well.

2) Secondly, I still believe something has to "break" in order for anxiety to be related to this. I know plenty of people with anxiety at levels I have never experienced, which haven't had a muscle twitch in their entire lives. Some are on heavy medications just to avoid regular panic attacks. Something I've never had. So there is something unique about this, outside of just anxiety. Maybe your trigger that "broke" whatever is broken, was the electrical shock.

3) There is a phenomenon called "Sprouting" after nerves have been fried. I am not saying BFS is sprouting but sprouting manifests a lot like BFS. There's a very remote chance you fried your nerve endings and they're simply regenerating, resulting in the fasciculations and (if applicable) nerve pain sensations. But this is probably not the case.... just interesting to note.

4) One doctor who is an expert in Neuromyotonia (the more severe version of what we have, at least symptomwise) believes that BFS is just a mild, nonprogressing form of Neuromyotonia. There have been documented cases of NMT starting after CNS onslaughts like bee stings / venom. For whatever reason, once it starts, it just takes off, and keeps going indefinitely. Mostly because people here do nothing about it. But with the Bee Sting situation, they gave immune suppressants and the person was completely cured.

5) There are situations where external things can cause the sudden production of autoimmune antibodies, to whatever has been introduced to the system. Usually when those antibodies are similar to human tissue cells, the immune system gets confused and begins attacking the human tissues while its trying to clear the invader. In other words, autoimmune reactions can come in 100,000 variations, and therefore it wouldn't be something diagnosable. There's a possibility we all have a trigger that has begun the development of immune responses which are affecting our nervous system. I dno't know if electrical shocks can do this or not, but ... in the end ... the CNS is an electrical system. So ....

-Burger-
How I resolved my BFS within 1 year of onset:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=19128
User avatar
BFSBurger
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 852
Joined: October 3rd, 2012, 10:19 am

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby yaumno on July 17th, 2013, 11:51 pm

muppetdog wrote:yaumno -

Pretty fascinating stuff.

So it has been only 4 months since you had your electrical accident? Approximately. Yours might just go away with time.

You say you started twitching after coming of Xanax?
You got the cogwheel before you subjected your body to the barrage of benzos and SSRIs?
I have had many Dr's say they can feel the ratcheting when they check for it. Have you had any Dr say they felt it?

Just some curiosity questions.

MD


Thanks for the replies guys.

Yes muppetdog, yesterday was four months since the accident to the day. And yes I started twitching a great deal while tapering off of Xanax, however this twitching subsided with my cessation of the drug and only lasted about two days. Fasciculations are one of the common side effects of benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome.

Also, yes, the muscle ratcheting and fine tremors in my fingers began before I had taken any psychoactive drugs. The only thing I was taking during the first week after the electric shock was Methylcobalamin (Vitamin B12) and Prednisolone (steroid). I prefer not to use the term "cogwheeling" to describe the muscle ratcheting because this causes confusion between the cogwheel rigidity found in Parkinson's patients. Cogwheel rigidity is a passive resistance to externally induced movements - so basically when you move a Parkinson's patients arm for them, it resists the motion and will not move smoothly even though the person is not flexing at all. The muscle ratcheting that I am describing only occurs during eccentric muscular contractions that I voluntarily perform. At rest, my muscles have no resistance to movement.

Also, yes, I have shown the ratcheting to the neurologists and the physical therapists at the National Taiwan University. They found it odd but had no knowledge of it. I have also had friends check my body and they can feel/see the ratcheting easily. If I flap my arms like a chicken, others can feel the ratcheting in my shoulders by placing a finger just above the rotator cuff. If I bend down to pick something up, others can feel the ratcheting in the muscles of my lower back by placing their hand just above my waist.

I also have two other interesting points about the ratcheting:

Firstly, if I perform these movements at very slow speeds then the ratcheting does is not present. So basically if I extend my arm very slowly the bicep does not wiggle and jump. However, if I perform the same movement at a normal speed, as if I were reaching for something, the ratcheting is clearly visible.

Secondly, everyone actually experiences ratcheting to some degree. I tested out my roommates "normal" body to see if I could notice the same things. Sure enough if I place my hand on his lower back and he bends down to the floor I can feel the muscles in his back shake a little. Similarly, if he extends his arm I can see the muscles quiver and jump just a little bit. The difference is that his "normal" ratcheting occurs during fewer degrees of the range of motion, is much less apparent, and he has to concentrate and flex in certain ways to elicit it. I did some of my own research and found out that this phenomenon is known as the, "physiological tremor." This is the phenomenon you see if you hold your fingers outstretched and they quiver a little bit. It is present in all individuals and can be exacerbated by extreme emotions. (Such as rage or fear.) The problem is that my physiological tremor seems to have gone haywire and is so pronounced that I notice it during almost all daily activities.
Tempus edax rerum: "Time devours all things" - Ovid from "Metamorphoses"
yaumno
Interested
Interested
 
Posts: 18
Joined: July 9th, 2013, 8:04 am

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby yaumno on July 18th, 2013, 12:13 am

BFSBurger wrote:1) Understand first and foremost that the medical system knows very little about anything pertaining to the brain, nervous system, and the immune system. As such, be aware that there is a whole universe of disorders that have no explanation at this point in time, and we all may fall into that category quite well.

2) Secondly, I still believe something has to "break" in order for anxiety to be related to this. I know plenty of people with anxiety at levels I have never experienced, which haven't had a muscle twitch in their entire lives. Some are on heavy medications just to avoid regular panic attacks. Something I've never had. So there is something unique about this, outside of just anxiety. Maybe your trigger that "broke" whatever is broken, was the electrical shock.

3) There is a phenomenon called "Sprouting" after nerves have been fried. I am not saying BFS is sprouting but sprouting manifests a lot like BFS. There's a very remote chance you fried your nerve endings and they're simply regenerating, resulting in the fasciculations and (if applicable) nerve pain sensations. But this is probably not the case.... just interesting to note.

4) One doctor who is an expert in Neuromyotonia (the more severe version of what we have, at least symptomwise) believes that BFS is just a mild, nonprogressing form of Neuromyotonia. There have been documented cases of NMT starting after CNS onslaughts like bee stings / venom. For whatever reason, once it starts, it just takes off, and keeps going indefinitely. Mostly because people here do nothing about it. But with the Bee Sting situation, they gave immune suppressants and the person was completely cured.

5) There are situations where external things can cause the sudden production of autoimmune antibodies, to whatever has been introduced to the system. Usually when those antibodies are similar to human tissue cells, the immune system gets confused and begins attacking the human tissues while its trying to clear the invader. In other words, autoimmune reactions can come in 100,000 variations, and therefore it wouldn't be something diagnosable. There's a possibility we all have a trigger that has begun the development of immune responses which are affecting our nervous system. I dno't know if electrical shocks can do this or not, but ... in the end ... the CNS is an electrical system. So ....

-Burger-


1: Yes I found this out very quickly when I started looking for answers. I took many neurobiology and pharmacology courses in college so I'm very familiar with the nervous system, but I didn't realize quite how severe our ignorance is regarding dysfunctions of this system.

2: I somewhat agree with you on this point. I stated much the same to my doctors - that during my lifetime I have previously experienced periods of much greater stress than this, so why didn't I develop this muscle ratcheting then?

3: From what I understand, sprouting is more likely in a laceration or crush type injury where the axon and surrounding glial cells are severed. Even if it was occurring after my injury it would be hard for this to explain the muscle ratcheting throughout my entire body. I would expect this to only be responsible for symptoms in the acutely affected areas. But then again if the current traversed my spine perhaps those neurons were affected too. (And I think it did traverse my spine because my left arm also hurts even though it was not shocked, and the median nerve responsible for much of both of the arm's nerve innervation traverses the spine at vertebra C5/C6)

4: I have read another of your posts describing this doctor and her expertise. You said that she had something like 35 years of experience treating neuromyotonia? I would very much like to speak to her and ask her opinion about these circumstances. If you have her email address or if she has a clinic available then please let me know!

5: I'm not entirely sure about the immune response idea, only because I don't know a great deal about this system. Although I think it might be interesting for you to know that I do have Eczema (atopic dermatitis), and have for basically my entire life. It's an autoimmune disorder where the immune system inappropriately targets the skin. The exact cause is still unknown but they think it has something to do with immune system support cells with damaged genetic material. I omitted this information earlier because I thought that it couldn't have anything to do with this but perhaps not?

Again, thanks for the responses guys.

Sincerely,
Spencer
Tempus edax rerum: "Time devours all things" - Ovid from "Metamorphoses"
yaumno
Interested
Interested
 
Posts: 18
Joined: July 9th, 2013, 8:04 am

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby Yuliasir on July 18th, 2013, 1:14 am

I somewhat agree with you on this point. I stated much the same to my doctors - that during my lifetime I have previously experienced periods of much greater stress than this, so why didn't I develop this muscle ratcheting then?


I wonder that your doctros did not explain you that before you were younger ahd had more abilties to compensate and because it looks like there is a threshold after which small damages become a huge one. Probably should not you experience huge stresses before (without any obvious reaction), you may not fall down after single electrical shock.
it is like with the other disorders; diabetes starts far before first bout of symptomes but there is a compensation period or hidden stage - and you can eat sugar or even abuse it, and only then BOOOM - diabetes. You can powerlift having for example Ca deficiency due to thyroid issues, but there are still some Ca in your bones - until you lift a kettle of water and BOOM - the hand is broken.

Our ability to compensate stress is also limited, however it may take decades for developing severe reactions. I have GAD since 6, but BFS after flu and severe stress - only since 41. I lived the whole majority of my life in really daily fear attacks but i started to have prominent physiological reactions only after 35 (I got urticaria, which probably was a first bell). should I ask doctors, where are my compensational abilities? hey, they just gone because i exceeded certain threshold or small deficites just accumulated and BOOM! BFS and somatic reactions for each and every stress. I itch when I feel my daughter is not calling for few days, I have cramps on vacation becasue I am too far from home, I got husky voice every time i become nervous for any reason...etc. etc. etc. I had to become really much more cautious after 40 ;) just because I am not 6yo girl any more which could really withstand anything.

if you did not reacted in some way once before, it does not mean you can not develop certain reaction somtimes in your life.
User avatar
Yuliasir
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 2952
Joined: March 3rd, 2012, 1:42 pm

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby yaumno on July 18th, 2013, 8:14 am

Yuliasir wrote:
I somewhat agree with you on this point. I stated much the same to my doctors - that during my lifetime I have previously experienced periods of much greater stress than this, so why didn't I develop this muscle ratcheting then?


I wonder that your doctros did not explain you that before you were younger ahd had more abilties to compensate and because it looks like there is a threshold after which small damages become a huge one. Probably should not you experience huge stresses before (without any obvious reaction), you may not fall down after single electrical shock.
it is like with the other disorders; diabetes starts far before first bout of symptomes but there is a compensation period or hidden stage - and you can eat sugar or even abuse it, and only then BOOOM - diabetes. You can powerlift having for example Ca deficiency due to thyroid issues, but there are still some Ca in your bones - until you lift a kettle of water and BOOM - the hand is broken.

Our ability to compensate stress is also limited, however it may take decades for developing severe reactions. I have GAD since 6, but BFS after flu and severe stress - only since 41. I lived the whole majority of my life in really daily fear attacks but i started to have prominent physiological reactions only after 35 (I got urticaria, which probably was a first bell). should I ask doctors, where are my compensational abilities? hey, they just gone because i exceeded certain threshold or small deficites just accumulated and BOOM! BFS and somatic reactions for each and every stress. I itch when I feel my daughter is not calling for few days, I have cramps on vacation becasue I am too far from home, I got husky voice every time i become nervous for any reason...etc. etc. etc. I had to become really much more cautious after 40 ;) just because I am not 6yo girl any more which could really withstand anything.

if you did not reacted in some way once before, it does not mean you can not develop certain reaction somtimes in your life.


I appreciate the input Yuliasir, however I'm not really quite sure what you're trying to explain. Diabetes and Thyroid dysfunction are both chronic, long-term issues with a clearly identifiable biological cause. Up until the night of March 17 I was perfectly healthy - no Generalized Anxiety Disorder or persistent mental dissonance of any kind. You have to remember that I'm 23 not 40.. if anyone has adequate abilities to compensate for an injury it's myself.

Besides, the temporal proximity between the shock and the onset of this muscle ratcheting makes it very unlikely to be attributable to previous life stress. Something specific has changed. Either a specific spike in my anxiety, or a specific physical change somewhere in my nervous system. I'm hoping that someone here has a similar experience or an opposite experience with the same symptoms for comparison.
Tempus edax rerum: "Time devours all things" - Ovid from "Metamorphoses"
yaumno
Interested
Interested
 
Posts: 18
Joined: July 9th, 2013, 8:04 am

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby SecretAgentMan on July 18th, 2013, 10:57 am

Have you considered trying acupuncture? It is often overlooked and undervalued, but I found it to be incredibly beneficial. I had the racheting muscle sensation you speak of. I would notice it when I would yawn and stretch in the mornings the most. Also the quick back and forth movment when brushing my teeth made it very apparent. Otherwise I could almost try to ignore it through the day. The racheting symptom was one of the first to go when I changed my diet and took out inflammatory foods. Acupuncture was also a critical role in my recovery. I haven't had the racheting movement sensation since 2010, but I remember it well. It was one of the more scary symptoms I had.

Although we all have slightly different stories as to how these symptoms just showed up one day, my acupuncturist now had a really good analogy that made a lot of sense to me. He said our bodies are constantly adapting to the stress, toxins, and abuse we subject them to day in and day out. The often adapt to allow us to keep on feeling good, but not all adaptations are for our overall health benefit. He compared the body's tollerance threshold for stress, toxins, and abuse as an empty glass. As we subject it to more and more and it goes on adapting and putting up with everything the glass begins to fill up. One day we reach the point where the water begins to overflow because the tollerance threshold has been reached. We can no longer adapt to feel fine any longer and something has to give. Physical symptoms begin to manifest. We are suddenly aware there is a problem, but the truth is it has been in the works for years. When he works on me, he is working to address the many adaptations that were made and tries to resolve them healthily so that the water level can lower. As inflammation and sources of stress are removed the physical manifestations (symptoms) diminish as well.
If your mind is your own worst enemy, why not make friends with it and turn it into your greatest ally? Mental discipline is achievable and there is help available. Learn what works for you, practice, and change your life for the better.
User avatar
SecretAgentMan
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 1048
Joined: June 30th, 2010, 3:42 pm
Location: Dayton, OH suburbs

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby BFSBurger on July 18th, 2013, 3:11 pm

yaumno wrote:4: I have read another of your posts describing this doctor and her expertise. You said that she had something like 35 years of experience treating neuromyotonia? I would very much like to speak to her and ask her opinion about these circumstances. If you have her email address or if she has a clinic available then please let me know!

Definitely. I would love to sit down with her too, believe me. her name is Dr. Angela Vincent. She is in the UK. you can google that along with maybe isaacs and you'll get some hits. Apparently the people on the isaacs boards have her direct contact information, and are able to email her directly (and actually do get replies). I would need to head over to that forum again and start asking around for it. You may have some luck if you start cyberstalking her too :D I'll PM you or post back here when i get a chance, if I get some email info. Otherwise im sure she's got a phone number and public clinic name you can google around for.

In the one email I saw from her she stated that BFS is "probably Neuromyotonia" and "in your case it seems to be benign" (the individual had a full paraneoplastic workup). So that was her whole take on the issue. I wonder if she'd have much more to offer if we inquired with her. I don't think she even offered the guy treatments. Just suggested managing his symptoms. But that's where lifestyle changes can play such a big role. I'd much rather pop a pill :)
How I resolved my BFS within 1 year of onset:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=19128
User avatar
BFSBurger
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 852
Joined: October 3rd, 2012, 10:19 am

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby muppetdog on July 18th, 2013, 6:19 pm

yaumno -

Just for logic sake lets sum up before you jump of the "BFS," Neuromyotonia, other cliff :)

You're 24 and lift weights like a normal 24 year old. About 5-6 times a week.

You don't abuse alcohol.

On March 17th you received 110v through a light socket.

You experienced numbness and tingling in your right forearm and hand from the shock. Along with this, you had a great deal of pain running down your arms. Your Dr prescribed vitamin B12, and Prednisolone (were you low on B12?) Are you still on those?

You felt anxious about hour health after that. Who wouldn't? You just got shocked.

The numbness and tingling went away in two days. That's good.

You started to experience "ratcheting" (not cogwheel rigidity) 4 days after the incident. After a week it was occurring all over your body. Was this after the vitamin B12 and the Prednisolone?

(Its a good thing you did ratcheting tests on your friends so you have something to go off of. Is yours that much worse than what you found in others?)

The Doctors ruled out MND with an ENG, MRI, blood tests, and SEP.

You tried a whole slew of Psychoactive drugs. They did not relieve the ratcheting. But after the alprazolam you had some fasciculations that lasted only a couple days.

You have never had nor are currently diagnosed with anxiety (other than being "worried" about what's going on with you) or GAD.

You have eczema, which you should not read too much into that being involved. Does it show a predisposition to autoimmunity? You don't even know if the ratcheting is autoimmune related. That's a leap.

So in the last 4 months since the electric injury you received, you have subjected yourself to a lot of health anxiety (again, who wouldn't), and numerous medications.

You still have the ratcheting and pain.

You don't have: fasciculations, cramping, buzzing, vibrations, burning, tingling (other than for a couple days), or anything other than pain and ratcheting.

Has the pain and ratcheting been getting any better?

Are you able to still lift weights and, other than experiencing your symptoms, live a normal life?

Just some food for thought before you get going on too many tangents and searches for diseases.

MD
User avatar
muppetdog
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 224
Joined: March 30th, 2012, 2:53 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby BFSBurger on July 18th, 2013, 7:12 pm

My initial mention of Neuromyotonia was not to encourage him to start looking at is as a possible diagnosis. It was just to point out that syndromes of malfunctioning neuromuscular nature can come from strange things, like (as mentioned) bee stings. I don't think he has neuromyotonia as his symptoms don't match.
How I resolved my BFS within 1 year of onset:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=19128
User avatar
BFSBurger
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 852
Joined: October 3rd, 2012, 10:19 am

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Postby muppetdog on July 18th, 2013, 7:57 pm

My initial mention of Neuromyotonia was not to encourage him to start looking at is as a possible diagnosis. It was just to point out that syndromes of malfunctioning neuromuscular nature can come from strange things, like (as mentioned) bee stings. I don't think he has neuromyotonia as his symptoms don't match.


Haha, yeah, I was not implying that anyone was leading him anywhere.

The human body is so strange. I was in South Africa once and saw this dude get zapped by an old, decrepit fuse panel. It was through his hands and he went blind for two days. It was nuts.

MD
User avatar
muppetdog
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 224
Joined: March 30th, 2012, 2:53 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: BFS soon after electrical injury? Please read!

Sponsor

Sponsor
 

Next

Return to Experiences with BFS

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests