Suz's muses...

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Suz's muses...

Postby SuziQ on October 22nd, 2006, 9:28 am

Hi everyone,
I had this idea of writing a daily devotional, here on the board, so that we can get away from all of the other "topics" and find some distraction from our twitching, buzzing, aching, tremoring, shaking, etc. So, here's my first "go," at it, but feel free to add little (or not so little) snippets of your own.

Blessings,
Sue

There's a great mountain in Washington State called Mt. Rainier. My husband and I once had the chance to climb a portion of it, though we had to stop at the snow-covered part for lack of climbing equipment, blow dryers, or indoor plumbing. :wink: Needless to say, it was a strenuous hike for me. I was accustomed to the foothills and puny little molehills of the east coast. To my surprise and shame, there were grannies with canes and two year olds passing me by on the trails, but I figured the air was thinner up there and I must have been a bit anemic from the change in altitude, PLUS there is always exercise intolerance to blame. :oops: ( Hey-the excuses work for me!)

Rainier is an breathtaking site, as mountains go. In fact, she is so tall, so large, so magnificent, that she can be seen from Seattle 3 hours away. But believe it or not, Rainier isn't always visible on any given day in Washington, even from close-up. Hubby and I noticed that while we were driving, Rainier would seem to disappear, and move, and re-appear again, depending upon our vantage point and the weather conditions.

It's hard to imagine that anything so enormous could disappear so thoroughly, yet she does! In fact, had I visited Seattle during a rainy season, I might never have seen Rainier. I would have had to take other people's word for her existence. Of course, it would have been foolish and arrogant not to believe those who had seen and experienced the mountain for themselves, wouldn't it?

The average person has a healthy skepticism about things, unseen. While this can be beneficial, protecting us from scammers who would seek to take advantage of us, it can also keep us from believing in our wholeness, when lying symptoms try to convince us that we are unwell.

Perhaps you are feeling skeptical about your health today, doubting the expertise of men and women who have far more familiarity than you on matters of NMD. Maybe instead, you are listening to the tall-tales your body is telling you, and not accepting your doctor's word that you really are okay. The symptoms of bfs can almost make your health; like a mighty mountain hidden by clouds, seem obscured, veiled, and hidden from view.

Permit those of us who've seen, and yes, hiked this mountain to vouch for your physical well-being. Don't put off life any longer, waiting for "Ranier" to appear. As sure as you are sitting there reading this...she is there.
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Postby basso on October 22nd, 2006, 10:02 am

I love your idea of a devotional SuziQ. If bfs leads us anywhere, it is to examine our own lives a little more closely. It turn, this leads, or should lead anyway, to a more devoted sense of ourselves and our place in the world. Real devotion springs from love, and real love springs from our spirit which was fashioned from love itself. Unseen, yet as palpable and awe-inspiring as Mt. Ranier.

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Postby SuziQ on October 22nd, 2006, 10:55 am

Thanks, Basso. I hope this means you will be adding many devotionals of your own?

I'm sure you're much better at it than I am....

Blessings,
Sue
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Postby wjjw on October 22nd, 2006, 11:26 am

Okay, I just asked for one, and this is what I got:

“Always seek guidance from that part of you which seeks to live down here in the world while at the same time gazing upward at the divine.”

I guess they like to keep it short, knowing we have short attention spans.
A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which are only accessible to our reason in their most elementary forms--Albert Einstein
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Postby SuziQ on October 22nd, 2006, 11:42 am

Thanks for sharing Bill, I always love short and sweet, though I seem to have difficulty honing that skill on my own. :oops:

I like to think of this life as a "Home Away from Home," of sorts, knowing that my earthly body is just visiting while my spiritual home is elsewhere.

Blessings,
Sue
Last edited by SuziQ on October 23rd, 2006, 1:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby SuziQ on October 23rd, 2006, 8:33 am

Don't be a "Yeah-But..."
Have you ever known one of these people? Someone with lots of problems, lots of complaints, lots of drama, yet lots of excuses? Whenever you offer what seems a perfectly viable solution, you get, "yeah, but," in response to every suggestion you make.

Aren't they frustrating? Surely, THEY can see how self-defeating they are.

LOL. Of course, I've NEVER been a "yeah-but," myself, have you?

Heh Heh. I'm afraid I know "yeah-but" all too well.

But, there is hope for us all. The cure for the "yeah-but" is to first recognize it in oneself, then adopt a "just do it" philosophy.

When one has a chronic illness, or a temperamental little "syndrome," it can really put us "yeah-buts" to the test. We can get so engrossed in our symptoms, our selves, our bodies, our misery, that we might beg to find motivation to accomplish anything in our lives.

In the twelve step program, they have a great catch phrase, "act as if." When we can't get our feelings in line with our goals, we sometimes need to "act as if," in order to get things moving in the right direction. Feelings can deceive us, much of the time, especially when we give them too much power.

How many of us say each day "I don't want to go to work," yet we somehow get our sorry asses up and go anyway? (I used to sing 'I don't want to go to work,' and dance around to the tune of 'The Chicken Dance,' every morning. :oops: ) Then, in spite of ourselves, we manage to go, and find blessings along the way. Generally, nothing stops us from reporting to work, because we know we must go in order to put food on our tables.

Well, living our lives and accomplishing our dreams is something we "must" go to as well. What's the alternative? Death on two legs?

And, those same destructive, counter-productive feelings which cause us to say "I don't want to go to work because I hate my job," are also what prompt, "I'm stuck in this job, but I have no other prospects."

Yeah-but, yeah-but, yeah-but, YEAH-BUT!

BULLHOOEY!

The healthy approach, of course is to go to work, go to living, but set attainable goals for making a better life, finding a better job...then helloooo? Get the heck out there and accomplish those goals. "Act as if," then, "Just do it."

We are only as stuck as our feet to the ground.

Blessings,
Sue
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Postby Christina on October 23rd, 2006, 12:28 pm

This one kind of goes along with Bill and Suzie's thoughts....

We are not human beings on a spiritual journey. We are spiritual beings on a human journey.


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Postby SuziQ on October 23rd, 2006, 1:39 pm

I like that Christina. It makes me feel better about all the bumbling and fumbling I do, lol. And that would be quite a voluminous amount. :(

I almost took out my other car mirror backing out of the garage yesterday. :shock: Last week it was my left, this week it was my right.

I just keep forgetting to look!

I have too much on my mind I guess. :oops:

My next house is going to have a three car garage with one whole extra car-length, just so I can back out unhindered.

Shhh...don't tell my husband, (or any men I know for that matter...they'll all laugh at me and tease me unmercifully, deservedly so. )

Thank God I didn't actually break it. Hubby would not have been amused. :evil:

Blessings,
Sue
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Postby basso on October 23rd, 2006, 6:17 pm

Sometimes we worry that we will not live a long life. We think about the things we won't get to enjoy... like our kids growing up. I have worried a good deal that if I were to die sooner rather than later, that the things I have in my mind to do, I would not get done. I would leave no legacy as it were, except the many post on this forum. :lol:

There is a season for everything. Even in our age of global-warming, there are seasons. Our lives, I think, mirror these seasons. We are born and that is spring, we grow up in the summer, and grow old in our Fall. Winter comes and we wither, and are no more. However, if this is true, then perhaps we are more a part of this world then we know, and Winter is just a time of dormancy. Our physical selves die, but that seed, our spirit; which is really us anyway, is just lying still. Waiting for a glorious new spring, an awakening into a glorious new life.

Very recently, I realized that I was going to live for a long time, and accomplish a substantial amount. It just descended on me, and I accepted it. I mean, isn't it as valid to say that we will live a very long time, as believing that we will perish before our time, before our Winter? Even at that, we may not really be perishing. It does something immensely valuable to your psyche believing that you will live quite a long time, it breathes space into your consciousness. Your mind now has a buffer of infinity, it is as though the stars themselves begin to sparkle inside of you. Marvellous really, fantastical, embraceable, amazing-able, and utterly real.

So, now I know that I will live many, many years, oddly I care less about the length of it, and more about embracing the seconds that bubble continually in front of me.

Today, as I walked back home from work down an old abandon rail bed, I saw a singular maple tree. There was nothing else around it, and it had scattered it's leaves all over the path, in a pattern that made me think that the tree had sneezed it's leaves off. That made me laugh, and I knew just how much I was really living.

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Postby SuziQ on October 23rd, 2006, 7:59 pm

Beautiful, Basso, and so very true.

I, for one will be most excited and eager to see and hear of the many, marvelous gifts you will bring forth in your long, blessed life.

No doubt it will be extraordinary, just like you.

Blessings,
Sue
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Postby SuziQ on October 24th, 2006, 10:24 pm

A little birdie was about to get himself kicked out of the nest for the first time.

I watched as he peeped in protest at his Mommy, complaining vociferously as she prodded and prompted him. Eventually, he took a clumsy tumble out, frantically flapping his tiny wings and had, I thought, a rather respectable virgin voyage into the wild blue. He was airborne, and loving it. And, he would, no doubt, never look back.

How soon he forgot the moments just seconds before when he was so belligerent toward his mother for daring to push him forward! He had not wanted to leave the security and protection of his warm, comfie nest, any more than a newborn wants to leave the safety of the womb. Only with much struggle and pushing from their mothers does either baby reluctantly venture into the brave new world.

What about you? Are you standing, frozen at the precipice of a much-needed change, but bucking it all the while? What are you waiting for? Your mommy isn't going to push you out. Thus, you must either make a decision on your own to take a flight of faith, or live in fear, discontent, stuck wherever you are. The choice is yours.

But...I bet you'd rather be flying...

Blessings,
Sue
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Postby basso on October 25th, 2006, 6:49 am

Little bird falls from the nest
then lifting up his tiny breast
he flaps his wings, though fledgling be,
they lift him up that he might see
a world so big, and from his berth
he finds himself twixt heav'n and earth.


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Postby SuziQ on October 25th, 2006, 1:51 pm

Aww Basso did you write that, or did Frost, or Yeats, or Longfellow, or Shakespeare?

Too sweet. Right now all of our little birdies have flown the coop...gone to Florida for the winter, LOL.

Blessings,
Sue
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Postby carrilynn on October 27th, 2006, 12:27 am

Someone once said we are here but for a reason. If you live your life without thought or care you are indeed not living but just getting by.

I look at my beautiful children on a daily basis and think of their life they must live. I will not let myself worry about the money they will make or the status they might carry..I must be grateful for the life that they have been given and hope above all they are happy, humane people.

I am no poet nor I claim to be wise or intelligent beyond my years but I carry a great amount of gratitude for life in general and the life that I have been given. I do not have profound comments nor enormous amounts of advice or support but what I have been given is worth all the tea in china. I have been given a second chance to reclaim the life I thought was gone. I have been give a chance to see what it is I have been missing or what I must embrace. I am full aware that life is but a brief moment but I also must grasp what I do have as an eternity to some. I must appreciate the love of my husbands touch, the glance of my child as they walk into school or even the glare of a driver rushed on his or her way to work. This is all part of life but it is something we must embrace and cherish for in and instant everything we hold true and dear can be gone. I've learned here from a many of wise men and woman to appreciate the now and to not fret the future.

We have but one life to live so living it well is worth the fight.

Love,
Carri
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Postby SuziQ on October 27th, 2006, 5:36 am

Aww, Carrie...being a mom qualifies you as wise, indeed!

Don't devalue yourself, you have much to offer, and what you have written here is proof of that.

Gratitude. Isn't that the most profound of all virtues? And, you are so right that we need to think outside of the box when it comes to whom/what we are thankful for.

I used to be in the habit of praying blessing over every crazy, nasty person I encountered behind the wheel, (and living in NJ, there are quite a few, lol. ) I've moved away from that pratice, but your post reminds me that they are people too. Surely I've given my share of dirty looks and leaned on the horn a bit too long, so there but by the grace of God go I.

Thanks for sharing. That was really beautiful.

Blessings,
Sue
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