Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

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Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Frenchcanadianchick on July 8th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Hi! I have had BFS for 16 months now and after a relatively 'calm' winter, my twitches are exploding, just as they were last summer. My feet have always been a hot spot and are pretty much going 24/7 but I am now starting to twitch and pop all over again. I am also experiencing cramping in the ankles and lower limbs, which I haven't experienced since last summer. Does anyone else notice an increase in symptoms in the warmer months? This sudden spike of symptoms is worrying me. :(
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Yuliasir on July 8th, 2013, 11:08 pm

Hi dear,
I was used to cramp much more in summer, as far as I remember. Try to drink more water, in my case it had helped a lot.

as for reactivity to heat and humidity, looks like BFS people are sensitive to both extreme heat and cold.
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Frenchcanadianchick on July 9th, 2013, 10:53 am

Thanks Yuliasir ! I hate the cramps! They always worry me!
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Yuliasir on July 9th, 2013, 12:16 pm

My own experience is that mine are related to problems with circulation and lack of Mg (MgB6course helps me a lot). You could check if MgB6 also would help you.
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby BFSBurger on July 9th, 2013, 5:18 pm

Frenchcanadianchick wrote:Hi! I have had BFS for 16 months now and after a relatively 'calm' winter, my twitches are exploding, just as they were last summer. My feet have always been a hot spot and are pretty much going 24/7 but I am now starting to twitch and pop all over again. I am also experiencing cramping in the ankles and lower limbs, which I haven't experienced since last summer. Does anyone else notice an increase in symptoms in the warmer months? This sudden spike of symptoms is worrying me. :(

Has your diet changed at all? I can pretty much self induce cramping and twitching by eating inflammatory foods. Or I can nearly eliminate it completely by doing the opposite. Typically things change in the summer. Even with diet. Maybe we eat more sweets. More pizza nights with movies. Who knows. You'd have to look at your lifestyle to really examine what might be different. Might even be a Vitamin D thing as Vitamin D in excess (maybe via sunlight?) is a trigger for some here. I would first check your food intake though. For some here, that can be the difference between a twitch-free month and a twitch-filled one.
How I resolved my BFS within 1 year of onset:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=19128
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Seepi27 on July 9th, 2013, 5:47 pm

Frenchcanadianchick wrote:Hi! I have had BFS for 16 months now and after a relatively 'calm' winter, my twitches are exploding, just as they were last summer. My feet have always been a hot spot and are pretty much going 24/7 but I am now starting to twitch and pop all over again. I am also experiencing cramping in the ankles and lower limbs, which I haven't experienced since last summer. Does anyone else notice an increase in symptoms in the warmer months? This sudden spike of symptoms is worrying me. :(


The fact that they 'exploded' last summer and this would tend to suggest that increased heat is indeed a trigger, and that itself should point away from anything sinister. Also, I know that you run a lot, and perhaps the combination of heat, exercise and, possibly, dehydration, is causing the seasonal flare-up.

Symptoms spike from time to time; I doubt very much that they are cause for concern. Just 'BFS normal' as they say.

:)
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Frenchcanadianchick on July 10th, 2013, 8:17 am

Nope, no significant change of diet. I believe that there is a direct link with the heat and humidity and yes, running in these conditions. I also recently got back from a busy and tiring trip in a very hot place. Fatigue is definitively another known trigger. The cramping got me googling ( :evil: ) and then of course I read things that I shouldn't have. Thanks for the support!
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Yuliasir on July 10th, 2013, 11:00 am

ah, crampin in a hot and humid environment is so common...do not worry! take a good rest, plenty of water and maybe Mg.
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby BFSBurger on July 10th, 2013, 11:51 pm

Frenchcanadianchick wrote:heat, humidity and running

Well there's your trigger. Here again we have a runner. Is anyone else noticing this or am I crazy? Im getting out of the shower today and just repeating to myself over and over - "There is a demographic on that site and I think Im the only one who notices it!" .... not everyone ... but a lot of people here are runners - bodybuilders - etc.... my brain immediately goes to HPA Axis Dysfunction. Yes - add heat to the equation and you've got an increased level of strain on the body. Why oh why must BFS'ers continue to run though? We need to tone it down. We overtrain. We overdo it ... ! This may be why we've caused the problem in the first place. Its not my place to say this but: "Consider cutting the running out, and maybe walk for the next 5 months instead". Got to give the body a break. Add ample amounts of electrolytes and replenish replenish replenish .... gatorade! We train and exercise, and we think we're doing our body a service by avoiding all sodium, and sugars, but all we are doing is damaging our body that is screaming for salts and sugars after training. I don't know .... i just can not believe how many here are long distance runners, bikers, etc... far too many for it to be coincidental.

HPA Axis Dysfunction. Adrenal insufficiency.

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How I resolved my BFS within 1 year of onset:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=19128
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Frenchcanadianchick on July 11th, 2013, 6:30 am

BFSBurger wrote: I don't know .... i just can not believe how many here are long distance runners, bikers, etc... far too many for it to be coincidental.
I wish it were that simple BFSBurger. Because of various reasons, I take breaks from running and the twitching never ceases. I haven't been able to run more than one or two 5Ks a week in the past month. I am a runner with anxiety issue, which I think is more relevant here. Anxiety seems to be the common denominator for all twitchers, runners or not. Anyhow, the heat and humidity dehydrate, which doesn't help the situation.
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby magnetizzum on July 11th, 2013, 7:20 am

I run 2-3 5k per week. I have done this for years. My monthly goal for total miles ran is u guessed it...26.2 which is easily obtained most months. However, my running is on a treadmill in 68 degree constant temp..no high heat situations and no cars going by to run me over. I have had muscle twitching since April and am still experimenting on what causes/reduces/or increases my symptoms. I say its ok to keep exercising but may try taking it indoors during the hot weather months.
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby magnetizzum on July 11th, 2013, 7:38 am

Also wanted to add that all my electrolytes/labs are good and in check that my neurologist has checked. I am still working on staying generally better hydrated.
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Frenchcanadianchick on July 11th, 2013, 8:02 am

Good point magnetizzum. I run on a treadmill in the winter and the amount of twitching is significantly less.
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby BFSBurger on July 11th, 2013, 11:11 am

Frenchcanadianchick wrote:
BFSBurger wrote: I don't know .... i just can not believe how many here are long distance runners, bikers, etc... far too many for it to be coincidental.
I wish it were that simple BFSBurger. Because of various reasons, I take breaks from running and the twitching never ceases.

Unless you're taking a 9 month break, the break isn't long enough. If ... and its a big if ... this is adrenal dysfunction, it takes minimum 6 months to a year for such damage to begin to recover. In the total absence of strain on the body. I simply can't believe people here are still running multiple 5k's per week. This should be immediately discontinued, and replaced with very mild, ongoing exercise with ample rest periods in between. Can I ask why runners must keep running? Is it an addiction to the high or something? Its almost like they are taken to it like people are taken to an illicit drug. When people suggest they stop, they go right back to it. I truly, truly believe this is a huge factor in BFS. No offense intended to anyone here at all. Just very confusing to me. I posted this on another thread, but ill post it here again.



Overtraining, Exercise, and Adrenal Insufficiency.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23667795

"Running, or any aerobic training in moderation, has a positive effect on health. There is a point of diminishing returns, where chronic stress from overtraining, which is common in runners, may be linked to problems in the adrenal gland. Overtraining Syndrome (OS) has been linked with adrenal insufficiency. There is a direct link between stress and the adrenal glands, and the physical stress of overtraining may cause the hormones produced in these glands to become depleted. Overtraining Syndrome (OS) has been described as chronic fatigue, burnout and staleness, where an imbalance between training/competition, versus recovery occurs. Training alone is seldom the primary cause. In most cases, the total amount of stress on the athlete exceeds their capacity to cope. A triggering stressful event, along with the chronic overtraining, pushes the athlete to start developing symptoms of overtraining syndrome, which is far worse than classic overtraining. Overtraining can be a part of healthy training, if only done for a short period of time. Chronic overtraining is what leads to serious health problems, including adrenal insufficiency. Severe overtraining over an extended period can result in adrenal depletion. An Addison-Type overtraining syndrome, where the adrenal glands are no longer able to maintain proper hormone levels and athletic performance is severely compromised has been described by researchers. The purpose of this review is to describe the relationship between overtraining, chronic fatigue, and adrenal insufficiency and to address the overlap in these conditions, as well as examine critical research on the relationship between the dysfunction of the adrenal axis in over trained and stressed athletes."



Blood hormones as markers of training stress and overtraining.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8584849

An imbalance between the overall strain experienced during exercise training and the athlete's tolerance of such effort may induce overreaching or overtraining syndrome. Overtraining syndrome is characterised by diminished sport-specific physical performance, accelerated fatiguability and subjective symptoms of stress. Overtraining is feared by athletes yet there is a lack of objective parameters suitable for its diagnosis and prevention. In addition to the determination of substrates (e.g. lactate, ammonia and urea) and enzymes (e.g. creatine kinase), the possibilities for monitoring of training by measuring hormonal levels in blood are currently being investigated. Endogenous hormones are essential for physiological reactions and adaptations during physical work and influence the recovery phase after exercise by modulating anabolic and catabolic processes. Testosterone and cortisol are playing a significant role in metabolism of protein as well as carbohydrate metabolism. Both are competitive agonists at the receptor level of muscular cells. The testosterone/cortisol ratio is used as an indication of the anabolic/catabolic balance. This ratio decreases in relation to the intensity and duration of physical exercise, as well as during periods of intense training or repetitive competition, and can be reversed by regenerative measures. Correlations have been noted with the training-induced changes of strength. However, it seems more likely that the testosterone/cortisol ratio indicates the actual physiological strain in training, rather than overtraining syndrome. The sympatho-adrenergic system might be involved in the pathogenesis of overtraining. Overtraining appears as a disturbed autonomic regulation, which in its parasympathicotonic form shows a diminished maximal secretion of catecholamines, combined with an impaired full mobilisation of anaerobic lactic reserves. This is supposed to lead to decreased maximal blood lactate levels and maximal performance. Free plasma adrenaline (epinephrine) and noradrenaline (norepinephrine) may provide additional information for the monitoring of endurance training. While prolonged aerobic exercise conducted at intensities below the individual anaerobic threshold lead to a moderate rise of sympathetic activity, workloads exceeding this threshold are characterised by a disproportionate increase in the levels of catecholamines. In addition, psychological stress during competitive events is characterised by a higher catecholamines to lactate ratio in comparison with training exercise sessions. Thus, the frequency of training sessions with higher anaerobic lactic demands or of competition, should be carefully limited in order to prevent overtraining syndrome. In the state of overtraining syndrome and overreaching, respectively, an intraindividually decreased maximum rise of pituitary hormones (corticotrophin, growth hormone), cortisol and insulin has been found after a standardised exhaustive exercise test performed with an intensity of 10% above the individual anaerobic threshold.

-Burger-
How I resolved my BFS within 1 year of onset:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=19128
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

Postby Frenchcanadianchick on July 11th, 2013, 7:29 pm

Believe me Burger, the amount of running that I have done in the past year doesn’t qualify as overtraining,…not even close.
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Re: Wondering if heat and humidity are BFS triggers

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