twitching little finger not boring

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twitching little finger not boring

Postby Rar on October 29th, 2002, 3:56 pm

Hi, I've had twitching for around 24 years. I am a 37 year old male. I guess it started around puberty for me. In the last ten years, and particulary in the last 9 months it has gotten more widespread and intense. I seem to have most of the symptoms that I've read about on this site, except not much cramping or fatigue. It does seem to be true that you never know what will happen next. Yesterday my occcasional fears of Parkinson made their first real attack on my latest temporary bout with peacefullness. Obviously after all the time I've had twitching ALS isn't a big concern. Anyways, yesterday I was sitting in a lecture (I go to UH Hilo) and had been taking somewhat copious notes rather quickly when I noticed my writing hand was feeling kinda strange. Perhaps this was a normal strange, that sometimes precedes twitching. In any case, I rested my closed hand on the desk for several minutes and then all of a sudden my little pinky started spasming or wriggling almost. This was a very intense type of tremor, more than I have ever experienced, and the more I noticed the worse it seemed to get. It was definately more of a strong, whole muscle kind of tremor, rather that the usual twitches I've grown so used to. I wanted to jump up and run out of the lecture before it spread to my whole body. Anyways, being a long time hypochondriac and tripper, I knew better than to give in to my fears. I pulled my hand off the desk and folded my arms. The shaking went away as soon as I did so. However I was still totally freaked out. I decided to put my hand back in the same position and see what happened. Almost right away it started spasming again, this time though I determined to go into a meditative state and just relax and notice it. The twitching seem to stop right then, but I was too freaked out still to leave my hand there so I just folded my arms. From then on through the next 20 minutes if I tried to take notes I could barely write legibly. Immediately after class I began to observe my pinky. I noticed that I could move it around but it would start to shudder and tremor quite rapidly and spastically. This condition lasted for an hour or so, where the pinky wasn't very coordinated and quite tremory if I moved it, but then later in the day it wasn't so bad. Later on that same day I was meditating, and I started to recall the spazzy feeling and the pinky began to tremor again, however it seemed I could increase the intensity of the tremor, and once I did so for a few seconds I could let go of the feeling and the tremor stopped. I managed to get in to see my doctor in the late afternoon where he permormed multiple tests and told me if I was fine, and that if I was going to be a hyponchondriac I shouldn't worry about Parnkinson's but ALS instead. He was joking of course, cause I have no signs of that. Anyways, does anyone relate to my sympoms at all. Was it just a sort of fatigue response, a new style of twitch for me, or the dreaded Micheal J. Fox disease?
Thanks to Aaron for all the cool posts and also all the other people. I love to read about how you twitch, we're like a strange brotherhood, or sisterhood. or whatever. whatever i mean i gotta go to class now, i hope i don't have to run out screaming. it's an hour and fifteeen minutes!
Rar
 

Postby Arron on October 29th, 2002, 5:32 pm

Hey Rar, hello from the mainland. I'm sort of a half hauli / half bro in that I own a place on the West side of Maui in Kapalua. Been to the big Island and to Hilo too. Nice place there!

What you described doesn't sound like Parkinson's at all and your doctor was right. Parkinson's won't come and go like that. As I type, my fingers are twitching too and earlier today, I was responding to one of the ladies on here and my left arm started to cramp-up just from typing. You never know what will happen with this stuff. Hang in there bro. It is benign and you are certainly not alone with your strange twitches and tremors. I know it's easy to panic and freak-out but keep in mind, you have had a twitch like that for many, many years and you are still just fine. :-) Don't let it get to you and try not to dwell on it. That just makes it worse. This stuff feeds off fear, stress and anxiety. Go kick back, watch the cool waves, the bikini's, have a fatty and hang loose my friend.
Aloha
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afterword

Postby Rar on October 29th, 2002, 5:42 pm

My class was all about earthquakes and tremors. It was extremely hard not obsess over my own. In fact that is mostly all I did, until at one point my pinky did move from side to side a little bit. When it did move it felt more like the good old-fashioned twitches, and it didn't get worse. I noticed it, started freaking out, and then it stopped. It resembled the toe twitches I have had lately. I always wondered when, or if they would hit my hands. I still can't determine wether I am causing this new twitch by obsessing over it, or wether it is a normal auto-pilot one.
During class my teacher used a long slinky spring connected between his and hand and mine (the twitching hand) to show the principle of compressional earthqake waves to the whole room.
I still would appreciate any advice, or commiseration regarding my previous post wherein I described the essentially strong and long lived nature of my pinky tremor/twitch. Is that a common one for anyone?
Rar
 

thanks

Postby Rar on October 29th, 2002, 5:50 pm

Thanks for the response Aaron, it made me feel better. That's cool you have a place on Maui. I would love to buy some land here, somewhere like Kamuela, but it's super expensive. I have to go study now. Midterms. take care, rar
p.s. i don't know anything about ettiquette on these forums, but my wierd website: is monkeychurch.com
Rar
 

Postby Arron on October 29th, 2002, 8:59 pm

Hey Rar, yes it is VERY common for twitches to hit one place and stay there for a long time, especially the fingers and eye lids, so you are in the "norm" for BFS for sure. My fingers have not stopped moving for the past 2 years. Sometimes they jerk in big, motions, sometimes they pull and hold for a second then release and other times they just wiggle at random in a very slight motion. A lot of people describe this kind of stuff with BFS and none of these are anything like any other nast disease so please don't worry about it being something really bad. It ain't! have a good one!
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Postby Davidd on October 29th, 2002, 10:46 pm

I can absolutely relate to the finger twitching. When my finger started doing this a few weeks ago, I immediately thought of the Michael J Fox story. It's not so "neat" to watch your finger move all by itself. Mine will straighten by itself or move side to side! It's really crazy!

As Aaron said, you shouldn't worry about it. That said, I do worry about mine a bit. I am seeing a neuro next week about all this stuff going on including the recent development in the finger.

Hang in there with everything!

--David
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Postby Debbs on October 29th, 2002, 11:34 pm

Davidd,

Ive have a wayward finger too, just decides to move all on its lonesome from time to time, wierd yes but unimportant. It will be interesting to hear what your Neuro says please keep us posted k.. :)
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Postby tlotoxl on October 30th, 2002, 5:58 am

Me too with the wayward finger. It was pretty bad back in July when I was the most stressed, but now it hardly ever happens. At the time I was reading everything about Parkinson's and Essential Tremor. I eventually started to think it was Essential Tremor, but the neuro didn't seem to think much one way or the other, and after my stress levels dropped a bit it hasn't been bothering me as much. Still, sometimes one of my fingers or toes will start involuntarily moving back and forth in the plane of my hand. Very distracting. Coffee makes it worse (isn't caffeine supposed to make Parkinson's symptoms better, normally?).

Anyway, whatever, neuro wasn't concerned and neither am I so much anymore. Hope you get some relaxing sleep and have a good visit with your neuro.
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Postby Davidd on October 30th, 2002, 9:42 am

I'll be sure to let you know what the neuro says but I am certain that the finger won't move at all while I'm there! It always works that way. That said, I will still describe to him the symptom.

As for caffeine, I remember reading somewhere that caffeine may help reduce the chances of getting Parkinsons but I dont think that this has been proven and I dont think that caffeine helps to alleviate the symptoms of PD once you have it. I personally gave up caffeine about a month ago because of terrible insomnia. I also gave it up because it seemed to make the twitching more noticable. It took about a week to kick the coffee habit but so far so good.

--David
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Postby tlotoxl on October 30th, 2002, 2:35 pm

i read that there was a study that showed an inverse correlation between caffeine consumption and parkinsons suggesting that either caffeine prevents the disease or that people who are susceptible to caffeine addiction have different dopamine systems that put them less at risk.

then i read anectotal evidence that some people with parkinsons found that caffeine consumption increased their mobility in the short term. dunno if that's true or not, but that's what i read.

in any case, i don't think our finger movements have anything to do with that.
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Postby Arron on October 30th, 2002, 11:24 pm

You guy's see where this is going with the caffeine studies? For decades we were told that caffeine was bad for the heart. About 10 years ago, Stanford University did a study that showed that caffeine has noting to do with controlling the heart beat and that it infact, only affects the nervous system. Now we hear that caffeine is good for preventing certain ailments in one study and the opposite conclusion in another. It is this very reason why I take the stand that I do on BFS, in that there is no conclusive study (yet) showing that it is or isn't related to Herpes, stress, anxiety, chemical imbalance, vitamin or mineral defeciency, copper levels, B-12 levels, CPK levels, viruses and so on. We can't get doctors and "experts" to decide whether something as simple as caffeine is either good for you or not good for you and we expect every semi-conclusive study on BFS to be "the answer"... it isn't and that is why some peopl ethink I am a bit harsh on what does or doesn't cause BFS. It's simple, we don't know yet and as with the wishy washy caffeine studues, so far all of the BFS studies have been even more wishy washy.
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