lower spine MRI - leg weakness

BFS Online Support Group

Moderators: JohnV, Arron, garym

lower spine MRI - leg weakness

Postby osbormd on March 22nd, 2003, 8:40 am

I am waiting on results from lower-Spine MRI that was ordered based on my complaint of leg weakness. The nurse said the Doc hadn't reviewed it yet, but in the summary it showed some degeneration due to Arthritis.

I have a bit of leg weakness and instability which I think is due to leg muscles moving around a bit when contracted. Ex. some of the muscles in the center of the thighs (similar amount in both legs) de-contract and contract rapidly when they are contracted. I think this is what's leading to the weakness and shakiness I feel in my legs.

I also see this in my calves - when I flex them, I see a bunch of rythmic movement under the skin and twitches.

Has anyone heard of this type of behavior?

Thanks
User avatar
osbormd
Senior Member
Senior Member
 
Posts: 80
Joined: January 11th, 2003, 10:42 am

Postby Arron on March 24th, 2003, 1:08 am

Yes, I have it too and so do MANY other people with BFS and without BFS. I have been SO busy lately with two of my businesses that I haven't been keeping-up on the BFS stuff lately and unfortunately, I have forgotted a couple of the terms and names for some of the conditions. I believe it was called Myokymia.

Here is an article about it. make sure you read the very last three lines where it says it is NOT associated with life threatening diseases...
Background: Myokymia, a form of involuntary muscular movement, usually can be visualized on the skin as vermicular or continuous rippling movements.

The word myokymia was used first more than 100 years ago, when Schultze described continuous, slow, undulating muscular contractions in small muscles of hands and feet. Kny used the term myoclonus fibrillaris multiplex to describe similar clinical manifestations. For the past century, different authors applied the term myokymia to different involuntary muscular movements. Most of them showed electromyographic (EMG) evidence of spontaneous group discharges. This led to tremendous confusion in conceptually defining this particular clinical entity and its electrophysiologic features.


Pathophysiology: The clinical phenomenon is characterized by its classic quivering movement of the involved muscle without movement of the joint. Myokymia can be seen in muscles innervated by cranial or spinal nerves. The distribution can be either regional or generalized, depending on the etiology. Also, it can be seen transiently in healthy subjects after strenuous exercise.

The exact mechanism(s) of myokymia is not well understood. Myokymia of the facial muscles is believed to originate from the facial nucleus or from some contribution by a supranucleus process; however, the presence of myokymia in polyradiculopathy indicates the possibility of a more distal generator. Most authors agree that myokymia in other parts of the body is generated by distal motor axons, either by a primarily axonal process or by segmental demyelination with secondary axonal dysfunction. Some have postulated that transaxonal ephaptic excitation occurs peripherally after focal nerve damage leads to formation of an artificial synapse.

Myokymia is believed to be associated with generation of spontaneous activity, including myokymialike discharge in the dystrophic mouse whose nerve root axons have no Schwann-cell enwrapment. By this mechanism, spontaneous discharge could initiate volleys of activity or afferent fibers could directly stimulate efferent fibers in the vicinity of the lesion and produce a self-perpetuating reverberating circuit.

The central nervous system’s electrotonic spread of discharge from rhythmic generators toward anterior horn cells also might play a role in generation of the spontaneous discharge. Each patient may have a different operating mechanism, depending on the particular areas involved and the different etiologies. The fact that patients with Isaacs syndrome respond dramatically to treatment of myokymia with phenytoin and/or carbamazepine suggests a possible abnormality of the potassium channel in this particular entity.


Frequency:


In the US: Although myokymia can be seen in patients with different neurological and medical conditions and occasionally even in healthy subjects, it is a relatively rare clinical manifestation.
Mortality/Morbidity:

Most of the diseases associated with myokymia are not life threatening.
The prognosis is solely dependent upon the underlying etiologies.
Myokymia is considered benign when detected in patients after strenuous exercise.
Arron
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 753
Joined: August 19th, 2002, 10:25 pm
Location: Sonoma, CA.

Postby dwl on March 24th, 2003, 3:47 pm

Arron,

A very interesting post. The first neuro I saw used the term "myokymia" in the letter to my GP. He had actually seen a twitch in my triceps muscle during the examination but hadn't mentioned it to me. After I had seen the letter I looked up myokymia on the web and formed the impression that it sort of meant bigger, slower twitches. I'm sure that there is a spectrum of twitching from tiny, buzzing ones to great big jolts. Most people who post here have had a variety of different-sized twitches and I suspect that many people will have had myokymia as well as fasciculations.

The more I read about BFS, the more convinced I am that the medics only know enough about it to say that it's not als or anything similar. Nobody seems to have been given much information about all of the other stuff documented on this site such as muscle pains & cramps, subjective feelings of weakness, rubbery muscles etc. This forum is a real blessing for those of us who have what is essentially a very worrying non-illness.

David
User avatar
dwl
Hero
Hero
 
Posts: 312
Joined: September 22nd, 2002, 4:50 am
Location: UK

Postby osbormd on March 25th, 2003, 8:54 am

Thanks Arron! This board is a life saver! :D


Mike
User avatar
osbormd
Senior Member
Senior Member
 
Posts: 80
Joined: January 11th, 2003, 10:42 am

Sponsor

Sponsor
 


Return to The Support Group

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests