Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

BFS Online Support Group

Moderators: JohnV, Arron, garym

Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby misterjuanperalta on August 24th, 2014, 2:02 pm

"Always remember when reading medical literature on the internet that in order even remotely use such information to consider evaluation or diagnosis, you must possess the requisite medical background in the way of medical education and experience. Physicans undergo an average of 12 years focused medical education and training in order to be competent in practicing medicine. This cannot be made equivalent in any manner whatsoever by simply reading about symptoms on the internet. Medicine and human disease is extremely complex and let when reading such information, it is erroneously thought to be a mere process of making associations between what a patient is experiencing and similarly described clinical signs of certain types of pathology. Remember, 12 years just to be permitted to professionally treat a patient, not counting the life-long experience and training necessary from that point forward to be considered competent.

I guess my point here is that you're falling prey to a genetic predisposition in all humans, wherein the brain will employ reinforcement of internal thoughts and perceptions construed as a danger or risk. In other words, from a more simplistic standpoint, if you see a bad dog and by its posture and signs of aggression, determine it to be a danger, the brain incorporates every single aspect of the experience in the way of sensory feedback and records it so that upon any future encounter, you will be able to detect the risk to your safety far earlier than the original encounter. In terms of what you see, hear, feel touch, taste or even smell, the brain records all of these events and collectively defines it as imminent danger.

The brain, however, is unable to distinguish between a real danger and one that is imagined. Do you understand? So if you experience strange physical manifestations and based upon general information you have been exposed to, your brain automatically records and stores this information together with your reaction to it. If you seek out additional information and it tends to reinforce your belief and assumptions, the brain defines it as a danger. If the matter remains unresolved, you remain on alert because you are creating fear in your mind as though the danger constantly exists. Does that make sense to you?

So in cases where a person believes something dreadful is befalling them, the brain actually responds to increase your preparedness to fend off the danger. By example, if the bad dog charges at you with intent to harm, your body will undergo swift physiological transformation in order to give you the best odds of physically fending off the animal or alternatively running to escape it. Upregulation of the nervous system is a primary part of that response and so all sorts of unfamiliar things begin to happen to the body, which are considered to be normal due to the circumstances facing them.

But in instances where the threat has been created internally by irrational fears that have no basis in fact, in other words pure speculation, the brain still receives the same exact feedback as in the case of our bad dog example and thus, the same physiological changes take place. In these instances, however, there is no immediate threat like in the case of the dog, but rather internal fear. The physical changes taking place are therefore not connected with a fear response, but seem to be immediately paired with symptoms of some type of disease taking place. It is through innate processes and social training that people make the direct association between physical symptoms and physical disease, but in actuality no such link exists at all. People can experience physical symptoms far more frequently that have absolutely no connection to a corresponding disease.

To sum it up, it is fine to seek out medical information on the internet, provided that you don't automatically assume that you have the requisite background and professional training ro properly assess it by comparison to any symptoms you may be experiencing. It simply won't work that way at all.

Secondly, nearly all physical manifestations that a person experiences are benign in nature and extremely common among humans, so to draw a premature conclusion based upon simple fears, you must pause to realize that the only basis for your fear is lack of sufficient knowledge to accurately distinguish between something benign and something pathological or harmful. So if you don't possess the requisites, then you must automatically question your fears regarding the overwhelming odds that you could somehow be correct.

Let's stop here for now. I trust my response has offered you information about yourself that might bring insight where your fears and concerns are of issue. You'll be just fine. Again, describe the fall in as much detail as possible for me and whether other falls have been occuring. Other than that, take a breath and relax." - Unknown source
misterjuanperalta
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 516
Joined: August 21st, 2014, 7:27 am

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby veryworried123 on August 24th, 2014, 2:19 pm

Thank you the post

I speak for most if not all when I say this had been the most challenging thing I've ever had to go through and trust me I and many of us have achieved and overcome plenty

It's unfortunate that many of us and me included spend our time in fear (off and on) and trying to disprove this theory of bfs
It's unfortunate that we believe and trust the dr when he tells us it's benign

How can this be begnin?
They must have missed something?
This is the beginning of something else?

It's a horrible cycle and horrible feeling
It take real effort to overcome fear

Thanks
veryworried123
Hero
Hero
 
Posts: 303
Joined: December 10th, 2013, 2:28 pm

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby Sadface on August 25th, 2014, 2:31 am

Can your brain cause symptoms?
For example: twitches.... Can I read about them, then get them?
Can my body mimic the actual symptoms of MND?
Sadface
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 205
Joined: October 25th, 2013, 12:52 pm

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby misterjuanperalta on August 25th, 2014, 7:50 am

One's brain is responsible for everything that goes on in the body.
misterjuanperalta
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 516
Joined: August 21st, 2014, 7:27 am

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby wjjw on August 28th, 2014, 6:24 pm

misterjuanperalta wrote:One's brain is responsible for everything that goes on in the body.

"Mind" or brain? Are they one and the same?

Cheers,
Bill
A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which are only accessible to our reason in their most elementary forms--Albert Einstein
User avatar
wjjw
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 1400
Joined: September 24th, 2005, 2:39 pm

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby SecretAgentMan on August 28th, 2014, 7:56 pm

wjjw wrote:"Mind" or brain? Are they one and the same?

Cheers,
Bill


I like the way you think Bill. I personally believe they are distinct and separate from one another, although they are very much connected. The brain is the physical organ that resides in our skulls. It is the hub of the central nervous system. Our minds however, I believe to be the seat of our conscious awareness and are purely energetic in nature. This is why they can have non-local properties or aspects, but we do a pretty good job at rationalizing these experiences away. Our minds and brains are melded for a lifetime and correlate very well to one another. A relaxed mind will yield slower brainwaves. A very active mind will yield faster brainwaves. The focus of the mind and its intended function will activate different areas of the brain that correspond to that area of the body that is affected. This leads many to conclude that consciousness is in the brain.

There are enigmas and mysteries though that hint at the energetic properties of the mind like the fact that memories cannot be physically located. People who have entire portions of their brains removed for tumors don't lose any memories. Some people develop a condition called hydrocephalus, or “water on the brain.” In these cases, cerebro-spinal fluid backs up into the skull and builds in pressure, with no way to drain out. In the most extreme cases, the skull can become almost entirely filled with fluid, leaving hardly any visible brain tissue at all. There are people however who develop this condition, lose all but a thin 1 mm layer of their brains (due to compression of fluid against their skulls), and still function as perfectly normal human beings with average (and some above average) IQs. All this despite having practically no usable brain. Add in Dr. Cleve Backster's work where he found strong evidence that plants consciously react to people and other plants around them. Plants don't have brains either. All of this lends credibility to the the hypothesis that everything is energy and energy is everything. What's more this energy is conscious and alive. That's just my 2 cents though...
If your mind is your own worst enemy, why not make friends with it and turn it into your greatest ally? Mental discipline is achievable and there is help available. Learn what works for you, practice, and change your life for the better.
User avatar
SecretAgentMan
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 1048
Joined: June 30th, 2010, 3:42 pm
Location: Dayton, OH suburbs

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby misterjuanperalta on August 29th, 2014, 1:54 am

wjjw wrote:
misterjuanperalta wrote:One's brain is responsible for everything that goes on in the body.

"Mind" or brain? Are they one and the same?

Cheers,
Bill


...and all that is associated most directly to it.
misterjuanperalta
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 516
Joined: August 21st, 2014, 7:27 am

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby Nytviolet on September 4th, 2014, 9:26 am

Hydrocephalus is how my father passed (at 90). I'm all too familiar with the condition. He had a lifetime of very HBP, and this was the result. My elder sister had POA, and refused a shunt which would've improved quality of life (bladder, gait, speech)...it was a shame. Thank you for your input.
2 Timothy 1:7 For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.
User avatar
Nytviolet
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 122
Joined: June 11th, 2014, 11:48 pm

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby RGB on September 4th, 2014, 12:33 pm

Sadface wrote:For example: twitches.... Can I read about them, then get them?


Plenty of anecdotal evidence (inc. here) that you can.

It is clearly possible to read about ALS and then 'feel' weakness etc. Likewise the list of somatic physical ailments is fairly long and (now) well established. But is it possible for the mind to 'conjure up' the real, physical, specific movements of twitches? Who knows.

Interesting though.

RGB.
My history....Jan '13: Widespread Twitches. May 13': Unremarkable Neuro Exam. Jul '13: Clean EMG. Oct '13: BFS Diagnosis Today's Date: Twitching and Healthy!
RGB
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 238
Joined: February 6th, 2013, 1:07 pm

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby J4son on September 5th, 2014, 1:54 am

RGB wrote:
Sadface wrote:For example: twitches.... Can I read about them, then get them?


Plenty of anecdotal evidence (inc. here) that you can.

It is clearly possible to read about ALS and then 'feel' weakness etc. Likewise the list of somatic physical ailments is fairly long and (now) well established. But is it possible for the mind to 'conjure up' the real, physical, specific movements of twitches? Who knows.

Interesting though.

RGB.


BFS seems to share a lot of patterns with hypochondriasis. After all, hypochondria is an abnormal concern about health issues despite zillions of medical reassurance. BFS seems to follow a similar path. Despite the reassurance of their own neurologists and despite the results of many clinical and electrical tests (EMG), some people are still convinced that their doctors might be wrong and that their risks of having ALS are high. Very similar to what happens with hypochondria.

Hypochondriasis is defined by the DSM IV as a somatoform disorders. A somatoform disorder is a mental illness characterized by physical symptoms that suggest physical illness or injury. So in my opinion it is not impossible that some of the twitchings might have their roots in some mental processes.

In my own case the twitching started out of the blue. But it was very focal (deltoid muscle) and lasted 24 hours and never came back to that same location. Yet, a few days later I learned through Mr. Google about widespread twitchings, and thought that at least I did not have that. Well the same evening my body turned into a popcorn machine and I was twitching everywhere.
J4son
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 163
Joined: November 21st, 2013, 12:04 pm

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby Sadface on September 5th, 2014, 8:54 am

I felt a bit better this week. Checked tongue only a handful of times. I did it morning and night as I know these were least twitchy moments.
However, just checked it then with my trusting torch, and it's randomly flickering on the surface to which I see but not feel at rest!!!
Argh! Why did I check
Sadface
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 205
Joined: October 25th, 2013, 12:52 pm

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby LKP1231 on September 16th, 2014, 8:51 am

I was actually hoping you'd say the mind can make your body twitch.
Actually rereading your recent post it seems the possibility is there.
Last edited by LKP1231 on September 16th, 2014, 9:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
LKP1231
Hero
Hero
 
Posts: 424
Joined: September 4th, 2014, 1:52 pm

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Postby misterjuanperalta on September 16th, 2014, 8:59 am

Sadface wrote:I felt a bit better this week. Checked tongue only a handful of times. I did it morning and night as I know these were least twitchy moments.
However, just checked it then with my trusting torch, and it's randomly flickering on the surface to which I see but not feel at rest!!!
Argh! Why did I check


The only tongue twitch that can be problematic is the constant, ocean waves twitch.
misterjuanperalta
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 516
Joined: August 21st, 2014, 7:27 am

Re: Retired Neurologist / Self Diagnosis / Internet

Sponsor

Sponsor
 


Return to The Support Group

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests