HSV in the CNS causing BFS

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HSV in the CNS causing BFS

Postby 6shooter on March 1st, 2007, 11:31 am

I have networked with individuals over the years with BFS, and began to become aware of a distinctive pattern surfacing for many of us. For some, fasciculations purportedly began to emerge at some point relative to a primary HSV II infection. While science has not been able to define this as a proximate cause just yet, the unyielding similarities have been fascinating.

I would like to network once again, and take it a step further and inquire about concurrent symptoms. In addition to the established twitching we've all experienced, I've encountered the legendary brain fog. It's a cliche term, but for lack of a better definition, I personally felt cognitively slowed. Confusion at times, diminished memory recall, great forgetfulness, careless mistakes, general vocabulary, grammatical, spelling, and reading hindrances. Times of concentration or thought will often provoke a headache, usually frontal. Other notable symptoms I and other HSV/BSF patients have experienced is a decrease in vision, especially at night. Best described as hazy, as if looking through smoke, and halos at night surrounding lights, or discovering anything illuminated or lit seems to appear as a double vision.

Just something to think about.

Cornford ME. McCormick GF. Adult-onset temporal lobe epilepsy
associated with smoldering herpes simplex 2 infection. Neurology
48(2):425-30, 1997.
A 40-year-old man with chronic genital herpes simplex infection developed partial
complex temporal lobe seizures of insidious onset, with EEG and MRI evidence of a
unilateral temporal lobe destructive, atrophic process. Extensive workup did not
reveal an infectious etiology. Three years of escalating number and severity of
daily seizures with memory loss led to temporal lobectomy. Histologic study revealed
active, low-level viral infection in the resected hippocampus and temporal lobe
cortex, with immunohistochemical evidence for infection by herpes simplex 2,
principally in neurons. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of herpes
simplex virus in neurons. Anticonvulsant-resistant seizure episodes began to recur
several times daily soon after surgery, but the addition of acyclovir to the
treatment regimen resulted in a substantial reduction in seizure occurrence,
maintained for the subsequent 2.5 years.
6shooter
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HSV in the CNS causing BFS

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