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BCFS Study

PostPosted: September 10th, 2015, 7:44 am
by misterjuanperalta
Summary

Muscle cramps are a common complaint associated with sudden painful involuntary contractions of a muscle. The mechanisms responsible for muscle cramps are still not clear. Axonal excitability and multi-unit electromyography studies were performed in 20 patients suffering from benign cramp fasciculation syndrome, not currently on medication. The measures of axonal excitability suggested greater inward rectification, indicative of an increase in Ih. Mathematical modelling suggested that the data were best explained by depolarization of the voltage dependence of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Parameters associated with polarization of resting membrane potential were not changed. These findings suggest that a role for HCN channels may become apparent during the rhythmic discharge associated with a voluntary contraction. Consistent with this view, patients had higher motor unit discharge rates than healthy controls during maximal voluntary effort.

In other words, BCFS triggers after-discharges after induced contraction. This is what neurologists look for when performing the Cramp Fasciculation Protocol / RNS.

Source: http://m.brain.oxfordjournals.org/conte ... 4.abstract

Re: BCFS Study

PostPosted: September 10th, 2015, 7:54 am
by Xina535
Thanks for this, but I am imagine that this would go over many user's heads. I know it is too technical for me to understand. If you understand this, would you mind posting a sentence or two to summarize the significance of this article for BFSers?

Re: BCFS Study

PostPosted: September 10th, 2015, 9:16 am
by misterjuanperalta
I've improved the original post.

Re: BCFS Study

PostPosted: September 10th, 2015, 11:34 am
by Xina535
after discharge - like after we move a muscle, a BFSer's muscle is still producing "harmless" electricity charges, like thinking it is still moving, but a normal muscle's electricity stops?
:?:

Re: BCFS Study

PostPosted: September 10th, 2015, 2:51 pm
by misterjuanperalta
This would not apply to you unless you were diagnosed with Myasthenia Gravis or some neuromuscular junction disorder. As far as I know, without EMG stimulation at varying Hz it would be difficult to cause after discharges. Again, I'm no Dr., but I'm basing the information on lay man understanding of the text and tests performed on me at Mayo Clinic.