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Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: August 16th, 2015, 2:24 pm
by misterjuanperalta
Zinc may impact BFS, as it is associated with neurological syndromes and diseases.

"Homeostasis of metal ions such as Zn(2+) is essential for proper brain function. Moreover, the list of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders involving a dysregulation of brain Zn(2+)-levels is long and steadily growing, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease as well as schizophrenia, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, depression, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Down's syndrome, multiple sclerosis, Wilson's disease and Pick's disease. Furthermore, alterations in Zn(2+)-levels are seen in transient forebrain ischemia, seizures, traumatic brain injury and alcoholism. Thus, the possibility of altering Zn(2+)-levels within the brain is emerging as a new target for the prevention and treatment of psychiatric and neurological diseases. Although the role of Zn(2+) in the brain has been extensively studied over the past decades, methods for controlled regulation and manipulation of Zn(2+) concentrations within the brain are still in their infancy. Since the use of dietary Zn(2+) supplementation and restriction has major limitations, new methods and alternative approaches are currently under investigation, such as the use of intracranial infusion of Zn(2+) chelators or nanoparticle technologies to elevate or decrease intracellular Zn(2+) levels. Therefore, this review briefly summarizes the role of Zn(2+) in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases and highlights key findings and impediments of brain Zn(2+)-level manipulation. Furthermore, some methods and compounds, such as metal ion chelation, redistribution and supplementation that are used to control brain Zn(2+)-levels in order to treat brain disorders are evaluated."

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22102982

Re: Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: August 16th, 2015, 5:45 pm
by leroyb
I'd be interested to see the ceruloplasmin levels of BSF'ers.

Re: Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: August 16th, 2015, 7:01 pm
by misterjuanperalta
My Copper was normal. Recently, I've ordered the following blood work Rx from my neurologist: PTH, TTG-IGA, RNA, GLYRA1-IGG, AGA-IGG, Zinc

The cause of my BFS will be sought relentlessly, at least as relentlessly as my BFS has persisted.

Re: Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: August 17th, 2015, 3:19 am
by leroyb
Ceruloplasmin binds to copper to remove it from bloodstream. To find your free copper level you need your ceruloplasmin levels.

Re: Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: August 17th, 2015, 5:34 am
by misterjuanperalta
Mayo Clinic already checked my copper levels. Normal.

Re: Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: August 17th, 2015, 11:55 am
by leroyb
free copper Levels of copper are tightly controlled in your body and ceruloplasmin is the liver enzyme that does that. You can have normal copper or even low copper and still have abnormal free copper. Free copper can cause neurological issues.

Re: Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: August 17th, 2015, 1:06 pm
by misterjuanperalta
I now understand. That imbalance is seen in Wilson's Disease (http://www.wilsonsdisease.org/about-wilsondisease.php). Treatment involves a zinc acetate regimen, as an example. A blood test for it is available at Quest Diagnostics or competent laboratory.

Re: Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: August 17th, 2015, 1:29 pm
by RIno468
i don't even know if this is related but

I notice a sharp decline in twitches when I take Magnesium and Zinc before bed

Re: Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: August 17th, 2015, 3:43 pm
by misterjuanperalta
You may be on to something.

Re: Zinc may impact BFS.

PostPosted: September 10th, 2015, 9:28 am
by crotwich
leroyb wrote:I'd be interested to see the ceruloplasmin levels of BSF'ers.


My ceruloplasmin levels were normal (0.19 g/L, ref. 0.15-0.30). Why do you think there is a link between ceruloplasmin and BFS?