Page 1 of 1

Twitching, Mosquitos, Encephalitis (WNV)

PostPosted: April 2nd, 2015, 5:31 am
by misterjuanperalta
Excerpt:

"West Nile Virus in Horses - Horses infected with WNV often exhibit signs of ataxia (loss of muscle coordination), which often affects the rear limbs, causing stumbling, staggering, and wobbly gait. Other signs include teeth grinding; muscle fasciculation; lying down with difficulty and an inability to rise; facial paralysis, twitching, and blindness. Treatment of infected horses is based on clinical signs with a goal of reducing the severity of the disease. Fluid and nutrient supportive therapy is often required."

"Human West Nile Fever and West Nile Virus Encephalitis - Most humans who are infected with WNV do not develop clinical illness. Approximately 20% of the people who are infected will exhibit fever, headache, body aches, swollen lymph glands, and a skin rash. These collective symptoms are defined as West Nile Fever. Symptoms of WN Fever typically last a few days. More severe infections include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, disorientation, coma, convulsions, muscle weakness, and paralysis. This severe form of the infection is defined as West Nile encephalitis. About one out of every 150 human infections results in encephalitis. West Nile encephalitis may last several weeks to months. Some individuals suffering from West Nile encephalitis experience permanent neurological effects. Following up with West Nile patients to look at potential long-term problems due to infection with Wests Nile virus, researchers reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, memory problems, loss of balance, tremors, and parkinsonism."

Source: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in117

Positive RNA is indicative of disease.

Source: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-cond ... n-20023076

Re: Twitching, Mosquitos, Encephalitis (WNV)

PostPosted: April 10th, 2015, 12:17 am
by BFSBurger
There are literally tens, maybe hundreds of infections like this one out there. I can't even count how many cause twitching. Its really good to know that twitching is *hardly* just an ALS thing. In fact, one of my biggest sighs of relief came during my research when I intentionally began looking up all the disorders, infections, and bug bites (!) that transmit things which can cause twitching. 100% of them were not deadly at all, and none of them were called ALS. Knowing that twitching and neuropathy and other similar symptoms can come from virtually anywhere (even a mosquito bite in this case) should give people here quite a sigh of relief.