calling Secretagentman - let's talk gluten!

General Topics

Moderators: JohnV, Arron, garym

calling Secretagentman - let's talk gluten!

Postby Englishtwitcher on December 18th, 2013, 5:59 pm

Now I've calmed down a bit and am more reassured by my neuro visit, I'd like to say that your posts about gluten seem to make sense. I did a bit of digging and had a look at my blood tests and I'm on the cusp of normal for anti g. I'm reading that gluten intolerance is more prevalent than people think and that it can cause lots of neurological issues. I did ask my neuro if it can cause *** and he said categorically no which was a relief!

However I'm thinking about cutting down at the very least and wanted to get your thoughts on it. Gluten free is tough but do you think cutting down is a step in the right direction?
Englishtwitcher
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 211
Joined: September 5th, 2013, 5:34 am
Location: London, UK

Re: calling Secretagentman - let's talk gluten!

Postby SecretAgentMan on December 18th, 2013, 6:29 pm

I am very happy to hear that you are reassured and calming down. It is very difficult to function properly when our fear and anxiety spin up and take us into dark places. There are mental discipline exercises that can help you learn to reassure yourself and calm yourself down that you may want to look into as well. This techniques and exercising because they are self-empowering. Each one of us has the strength within to take control of our own levels of happiness. The trick is just learning how to do it.

Anyway, on to gluten... The main issue with any inflammatory food reaction is that you can be exposed to a lot or a little but your body reacts just the same because your immune system does not know how much to anticipate. A crumb is all it can take for a person allergic to peanuts to go into food anaphylaxis – a severe full-body allergic reaction that often leads to airway blockage and cardiac arrest. Much in the same way the body's immune response can be severe to gluten causing system wide inflammation and an autoimmune neurological reaction. The reason gluten is usually singled out as special is because of the reaction it causes in the intestinal tract where the cell wall permeability allows more toxins and undigested proteins into the blood stream. This happens to ALL people whether they are sensitive to gluten or not. The only difference is that in most people the cell wall permeability heals itself quickly. When somebody develops a sensitivity to gluten their cell wall permeability remains inflamed for prolonged periods of time because the immune system begins to target not only the gluten proteins but also the cell walls of the intestines and other parts of the body (including the nervous system). This is why gluten is being strongly correlated to autoimmune conditions.

For these reasons I do not believe it will do you much good at all to simply just cut back. If you are serious about looking into the possibility of you having a gluten sensitivity you can have your doctor order a blood test kit from www.foodallergy.com which will test your blood IgE antibodies against 96 of the most common foods including gluten. If you come back sensitive to gluten take it as GOOD NEWS because you will have your answer as to what is causing all of your whacky BFS symptoms. Yes, it is a trouble to change your diet and cut out certain foods like gluten, but leaky gut syndrome is ONLY TEMPORARY until you get it treated and healed. You cannot heal if your system is inflamed though so this is why cutting out inflammatory foods is imperative. There are supplements I can suggest to help you speed your recovery while you stay on a special anti-inflammatory diet. After a few months you can start working foods back in slowly.

I experienced some of the most scary and horrible BFS symptoms that most people on this forum have gone through. I have COMPLETELY recovered though because I took this seriously, did the hard work on keeping to a diet, and embraced the unconventional areas of medicine that had a track record for helping people like me. The results could not make me happier. I still scratch my head when I see so few people take interest in even humoring looking into their diet. I realize it does not seem intuitive to connect the cut to the nervous system but more and more research is coming out to show the connection.

At the age of 30 I developed a gluten intolerance and didn't even realize it until I started looking into leaky gut syndrome and changed my diet. The blood test I referenced above helped me make the right changes. My symptoms began to ease and I knew I was on the right track. I stuck to the diet and the supplements my doctor recommended and a few months later I was working foods back in. I've been eating gluten again for years and I'm still doing just fine. I eat a much more balanced diet now and I eat less sugar. I also manage my stress much better too. I'm of the belief that a great many people here are suffering with a case of leaky gut syndrome and just don't realize it. I realize this may not be the case for everyone, but I bet there are quite a few. It's a solution that I wish everyone would seriously consider or look into. I'd be happy to answer more questions. Just let me know. And thank you again for the post.
If your mind is your own worst enemy, why not make friends with it and turn it into your greatest ally? Mental discipline is achievable and there is help available. Learn what works for you, practice, and change your life for the better.
User avatar
SecretAgentMan
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 1048
Joined: June 30th, 2010, 3:42 pm
Location: Dayton, OH suburbs

Re: calling Secretagentman - let's talk gluten!

Postby Englishtwitcher on December 18th, 2013, 6:44 pm

Thanks for the explanation. It's actually quite confusing because it's hard to know if having these antibodies in your blood is normal. I read one site that said having even some is showing your body reacting but it did not say if we all have some levels of anti g and anti a. My anti e was 0, antig igA was 11 (normal 0-11.9) and anti g igg was 5 (same normal ranges) and my iga serum was -2 I think which is a bit odd but it says it's within normal

It's the antig igA that's looking borderline. If I'm not celiac then surely I'm gluten sensitive? What do you think?
Englishtwitcher
Selfless giver of time
Selfless giver of time
 
Posts: 211
Joined: September 5th, 2013, 5:34 am
Location: London, UK

Re: calling Secretagentman - let's talk gluten!

Postby SecretAgentMan on December 18th, 2013, 7:33 pm

You can have a sensitivity or intolerance to gluten while not having celiac's disease. This was the case for me. Just for an example of what the blood test results look like that I referenced, here is mine: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/105 ... 20Test.pdf
If your mind is your own worst enemy, why not make friends with it and turn it into your greatest ally? Mental discipline is achievable and there is help available. Learn what works for you, practice, and change your life for the better.
User avatar
SecretAgentMan
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 1048
Joined: June 30th, 2010, 3:42 pm
Location: Dayton, OH suburbs

Re: calling Secretagentman - let's talk gluten!

Sponsor

Sponsor
 


Return to General Topics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests