Is BFS considered a disability?

Information about how to manage or reduce the severity of BFS symptoms

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Is BFS considered a disability?

Postby unlucky_guy on December 8th, 2004, 5:41 pm

The reason I ask is because I am taking final exams in school, and well, the non-stop twitching definitely messes up my concentration. Do you think I could call it a disability and apply for special accomodations (extra time), when taking exams??
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Postby Ava on December 9th, 2004, 12:31 am

I do not consider my BFS to be in any way a disability.

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Disability?

Postby Davey on December 9th, 2004, 6:01 pm

You would likely have to get your physician to provide a letter documenting your disability. Certainly in severe cases of PNH where it would be difficult to walk, etc., then you could probably persuade a doctor. You could even probably get the DMV to give you a handicap parking placard. However, if it is just bothering you, that is another story.

Your anxiety and bother is not likely worse than when I had to take final exams after finding out my mother had breast cancer. Although anxiousness and worry do affect concentration, where do you draw the line? Stephen Hawking found out he had ALS when he was doing his PhD work. What did he do? He finished his PhD. See his story here.

My advice: start studying. :wink:
Cheers,

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Re: Disability?

Postby unlucky_guy00 on December 10th, 2004, 5:01 am

Davey wrote:You would likely have to get your physician to provide a letter documenting your disability. Certainly in severe cases of PNH where it would be difficult to walk, etc., then you could probably persuade a doctor. You could even probably get the DMV to give you a handicap parking placard. However, if it is just bothering you, that is another story.

Your anxiety and bother is not likely worse than when I had to take final exams after finding out my mother had breast cancer. Although anxiousness and worry do affect concentration, where do you draw the line? Stephen Hawking found out he had ALS when he was doing his PhD work. What did he do? He finished his PhD. See his story here.

My advice: start studying. :wink:


Right...but its kind of hard to concentrate when you are physically twitching all over the place. My eyes twitch like crazy, my arms, my legs, my neck, my cheeks...even my prostrate twitches believe it or not. They aren't little twitches either, they are the real thumpers. So with all of that going on, I have a hard time concentrating on my exam. If it was a mental impairment...then fine. But I'm physically twitching all over the place, and it really is bothersome...
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Postby jcavan4125 on December 10th, 2004, 7:08 am

There are medications that can reduce the twitches. Neurontin works well for some and tegretol or klonopin works for others. I suggest you talk with your doctor.
Joe... "That which does not kill us makes us stronger"! - Nietzsche
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To Unluckyguy

Postby Davey on December 10th, 2004, 4:04 pm

Yes, it is bothersome, especially the facial twitches.

Like I said, you could try to get a physician's letter. After all, some people with BFS report cognitive problems. It might be worth a try.

Good luck on your exams, regardless.

:D
Cheers,

Dave

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dunno about "disability"; but...

Postby Ish on December 19th, 2004, 5:47 pm

I don't know about the "disability" in the relevant sense here, but I do want to speak in favor of seeing BFS as a serious quality of life issue, which may be somewhat at odds with a theme on these bbss.

I have what may be extreme case. 24/7 constant all over twitching with terrific soreness and stiffness resulting. On the one hand I am used to it enough that the twitching itself doesn't bother me much at all. I really don't care. And I have no anxiety or mental stress.

But on the other hand I have a great deal of fatigue as a secondary effect of the constant neuromuscluar activity. It reduces my daily productivity by 50%. So much so that it will soon knock me out of my life's work if there isn't any improvement.
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dunno about "disability"; but...

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