Neurontin and Klonopin giving fairly good relief of symptoms

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Neurontin and Klonopin giving fairly good relief of symptoms

Postby Buzzygirl on November 10th, 2004, 11:27 pm

Hi fellow twitchers and buzzers!

I am currently taking Neurontin 200 mg 3 x daily, and Klonopin .25 a.m., mid-day, and .5mg at bedtime. Last night I went to bed and actually had very minimal symptoms. No trembling, slight buzzing in the leg. Seemed like things were going to great. Had a good sleep. This morning I took the Neurontin 200mg and my Klonopin. I felt a little spaced out today, but was still able to function well. I'm thinking of cutting back on the daytime Neurontin, and saving the higher dose for bedtime. I took my meds about an hour ago, and feel pretty good. Just thought I should share this in case others would like to ask their M.D. about prescription meds for their symptoms.

Good Luck to all, and to all a calm, quiet night!
Karen
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Postby traveler27 on November 11th, 2004, 3:12 pm

Hi there! I take Tegretol vs. Neurontin - can someone tell me the difference of how these are supposed to work? I also take Klonopin at bedtime - I break the .5 mg. tablet in half, and try to go with that. This has worked for quite some time, but now my sleeping problems are getting worse again. I'm concerned about the long term use of this - over a year now for me. I'd also appeciate some insight on that.
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Tegretol vs. Neurontin

Postby Buzzygirl on November 11th, 2004, 8:36 pm

Hi,
Both of these drugs are in the "anticonvulsant" category. How they work at the cellular level I'm not sure. My doctor told me that Neurontin is relatively safe, is excreted by the kidneys and doesn't affect the liver. I know it is frequently prescribed for neuralgia (nerve pain). Some people may take it for Sciatica, some for pain related to diabetic neuropathy, or any other pain that is related to nerves. In my case I believe the anti convulsant properties are calming my neurological symptoms and the pain relieving property has relieved the achiness in my legs. If the Tegretol is working for you I don't know if Neurontin would be preferable or not. You should discuss that with your M.D. As far as the Klonopin is concerned, I don't think you should worry about taking it. You're using it for symptom relief, that does not cause addiction. If someone could wave a magic wand and take away your BFS symptoms, I'm sure you could gradually wean off of the medication and have no desire for it.



I am currently taking the Klonopin .5 mg and Neurontin 200mg at night, in order to get some peaceful rest. If you need to take the whole tab of Klonopin at night in order to sleep, do it.
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Re anti-convulsant meds

Postby stevepaul on November 12th, 2004, 6:10 pm

Hi traveler

With regards to how the anti-convulsants are thought to help control this disorder. They are designed primarily to control epilepsy by cutting down on the electrical activity in the brain. (no you don't have Epilepsy)

My neuro told me it is probable, that it also helps to reduced electrical activity in the sodium channel, read post in Questions about. Hope this helps.

Karen.

Have you tried crossing your legs recently. I'll let you explain that one.

Goodbye from accross the pond.

Steve
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Postby LeeNC on November 12th, 2004, 7:49 pm

Buzzygirl, what on earth does Steve mean? Sounds fun!
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Done Neurontin for RLS

Postby Davey on November 16th, 2004, 2:06 pm

A couple of years ago I was on Neurontin for Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) (those creepy crawly sensations and leg jerking as you fall asleep, also known as nocturnal myoclonus). It helped me, but eventually I stopped taking it when my RLS subsided. I didn't notice any difference in the twitching, but it help eliminate the RLS.

Neurontin(R) (gabapentin) is structurally related to gamma-aminobutyric acid, a neurotransmitter (GABA), but is not converted to GABA or inhibit the reuptake of GABA. How it works is unknown (comforting thought!). It works as an anti-seizure and pain-killing medication.

Tegretol (R) (carbamazepine) is unrelated to other anti-convulsants and analgesics. It reduces the polysynaptic response and blocks post-tetanic potentiation. How it works is also unknown (Amazing how we take these medicines when the drug companies have no idea how they actually work!). A disturbing rare side effect of Tegretol that has been observed is the occurrence of aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis and other blood and bone marrow disorders.

You can get all this information at www.rxlist.com
Cheers,

Dave

Proud sufferer of Cramp-Fasciculation Syndrome since June 2001.

"Do not fear death tomorrow so much that you forget to live today."
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Crossing my legs

Postby Buzzygirl on November 16th, 2004, 5:30 pm

Lee,
Steve is referring to some advice he gave for stopping the buzzing sensation I have in my legs. He had suggested tapping your foot on the floor while sitting. This did in fact stop the buzz! I told him it worked well for me, and he replied that since we ladies like to cross our legs while seated I may want to try just swinging my leg slightly, rather than the foot tapping. Not quite as fun as it sounds huh? :roll: I haven't tried it yet, but I'll bet it works for those of us with vibration/buzzing sensations in the lower extremities.
Take care,
Karen
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Re: Crossing my legs

Postby LeeNC on November 16th, 2004, 9:50 pm

Buzzygirl wrote:Lee,
Steve is referring to some advice he gave for stopping the buzzing sensation I have in my legs. He had suggested tapping your foot on the floor while sitting. This did in fact stop the buzz! I told him it worked well for me, and he replied that since we ladies like to cross our legs while seated I may want to try just swinging my leg slightly, rather than the foot tapping. Not quite as fun as it sounds huh? :roll: I haven't tried it yet, but I'll bet it works for those of us with vibration/buzzing sensations in the lower extremities.
Take care,
Karen


Ah, thanks for explaining, Karen! I experience the vibration/buzzing feeling on the soles of my feet, but these days I can basically ignore the sensation except when I'm lying in bed. Bed is no place for leg swinging or toe tapping, though. (And, no, I don't want to hear any suggestions to the contrary!) :wink:

--LeeNC
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Re: Crossing my legs

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