rTMS treatment for BFS

Information about how to manage or reduce the severity of BFS symptoms

Moderators: JohnV, Arron, garym

rTMS treatment for BFS

Postby nonstop on September 17th, 2011, 8:46 am

Has anyone explored the possibility that repetitive Transcranial Magentic Stimulation might be able to inhibit the muscle twitches?

I know that as part of rTMS treatment for depression they stimulate your motor cortex to determine your motor threshold. This involves turning up the volume on the rTMS over your motor cortex until your thumb jumps involuntarily. This is exciting that part of the brain. rTMS can also inhibit when used at 1Hz frequency.

I wonder if rTMS at 1Hz over the motor cortex could inhibit these twitches.

Any thoughts on this?
nonstop
Member
Member
 
Posts: 40
Joined: January 31st, 2011, 5:20 am

Re: rTMS treatment for BFS

Postby chrissi on September 17th, 2011, 11:13 am

Hmm, don't know. Actually I had TMS for testing my upper Motoneurons when checked for MND becauseof the twitching and it felt-well----not very good. After TMS my twitching was even worse, but might change with the freequency that is used. Most likely the effects are different in using it for diagnosis or treatment.
"Our anxiety does not come from thinking about the future, but from wanting to control it" Kahlil Gibran
Anxiety is a thin stream of fear trickling through the mind. If encouraged, it cuts a channel into which all other thoughts are drained
User avatar
chrissi
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 1538
Joined: August 10th, 2011, 2:06 am
Location: Germany

Re: rTMS treatment for BFS

Postby nonstop on September 19th, 2011, 4:41 pm

Crossed inhibition of sensory cortex by 0.3 Hz transcranial magnetic stimulation of motor cortex.
Seyal M, Shatzel AJ, Richardson SP.
SourceDepartment of Neurology, University of California-Davis Medical Center, 2315 Stockton Boulevard, Rm. 5308, Sacramento, CA 95817, U.S.A. [email protected]

Abstract
Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of motor cortex causes persistent inhibitory effects in the targeted area. rTMS of motor cortex impairs sensory perception and results in a persistent change in cortical function at remote sites. The ability of rTMS to induce sustained changes in cortical function has led to studies testing its therapeutic efficacy in neurologic disorders, including epilepsy. Studies on the effect of low-frequency rTMS of motor cortex on the contralateral motor cortex have provided evidence for both inhibitory and excitatory changes. This study was designed to determine the effect of low-frequency rTMS of the right motor cortex on the contralateral sensory cortex. Before and after 0.3-Hz rTMS of right motor cortex, perception of ipsilateral threshold of cutaneous stimuli was assessed and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded after stimulation of the right thumb in eight normal subjects. In a control group of six subjects, sensory responses were assessed after rTMS anterior to the right motor cortex. After rTMS of motor cortex, detection of threshold sensory stimuli decreased by more than 50% compared with pre-rTMS (P < 0.05). The change in sensory perception lasted at least 30 minutes. No change was detected in the control group. Amplitude of the N20-P25 waveform of the SEP decreased from a mean of 0.84 muV before rTMS to 0.54 muV immediately after rTMS of motor cortex (P < 0.05). 0.3 Hz rTMS of motor cortex inhibits the contralateral sensory cortex.

PMID: 16462199 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
nonstop
Member
Member
 
Posts: 40
Joined: January 31st, 2011, 5:20 am

Re: rTMS treatment for BFS

Postby chrissi on September 20th, 2011, 1:34 am

But in epilepsie you have changes in the brain , which is stimulized. The effects of TMS that can be seen (the jerking on that chair) is only the effect of that motor cortex stimulation. There are some theories about what might cause BFS, but nothing points to the conclusion that the nerves in the brain are affected at all. Hmm, this whole nerve stuf is hard to explain in an foreign language, but from brain to nerve endings there are various stations to be passed, and most likely BFS "sits" somewhere in the region spine or nerve cell membranes themselves. Don't forget that most of us have sensory issues too, this means that it is most likely a " common nerve thing" and not a "motor nerve thing". But if you find a doc that would try it for you, maybe it helps. I'd rather try TMS than pills , TMS does not affect your liver. And theories are only theories until they are proved to be right.
"Our anxiety does not come from thinking about the future, but from wanting to control it" Kahlil Gibran
Anxiety is a thin stream of fear trickling through the mind. If encouraged, it cuts a channel into which all other thoughts are drained
User avatar
chrissi
Saint
Saint
 
Posts: 1538
Joined: August 10th, 2011, 2:06 am
Location: Germany

Re: rTMS treatment for BFS

Sponsor

Sponsor
 


Return to Symptom Management

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest